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— Telecommunications

Facebook joins forces with Samsung, Nokia, etc. to bring internet to the world

If you thought Facebook was only good for spamming you with Farmville updates and showing you what your high school classmates ate for lunch, think again. The social network just teamed up with a consortium of other tech big-wigs to form Internet.org, an organization dedicated to bringing the internet to the two-thirds of the world that is still without it. Read More
— Environment

Game helps scientists fight ash disease

Playing video games and feeling virtuous may seem almost like a contradiction in terms, but the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK has turned gaming into a way to advance science and help protect the environment. The Fraxinus game is a Facebook app that uses player participation to figure out the structure of a fungus genome, as part of a crowdsourcing effort to combat a disease that threatens Britain and Europe’s ash trees. Read More
— Telecommunications

Big Brother is here, and his name is PRISM

If there was any doubt that George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four was a prophetic piece of fiction, you can pretty much put that to rest. The more skeptical among us have claimed for years that, in the age of the internet, nobody has real privacy. During the last 24 hours, those fears emerged from the shadows. Details leaked of the secret US National Security Agency (NSA) program called PRISM, which may as well have been called Big Brother. Read More
— Electronics

Like Machine exchanges Pepsi for Facebook thumbs

How much is a Facebook Like worth? To you, probably nothing, with updates or comments receiving numerous Likes making no difference to your life. For brands, it's different. Each Facebook Like is another notch on the bedpost, with a real person having publicly stated that they like this company so much they don't care who knows it. The Facebook users liking brands usually don't get anything for their free promotional efforts, but Pepsi has changed that with the introduction of Pepsi: The Like Machine. Read More

New research explains why Facebook posts are so memorable

The success of social networks such as Facebook may provide clues to the type of information the human mind tends to favor. New research suggests human memory prefers spontaneous writing favored by users communicating online to grammatically polished text found in edited material. This the gist of the findings presented in a paper called Major Memory for Microblogs, which details the results of a research comparing memory retention of Facebook updates to book excerpts and faces. Read More
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