Computational creativity and the future of AI

Face Detection

Researchers have found a new way to spot faces at any angle (Photo: Shutterstock)

Face detection software has slowly crept into mainstream use, from Facebook photo tagging to Android phone unlocking, but new research looks set to move the technology on significantly. Scientists at Yahoo Labs and Stanford University have come up with a new approach that can register faces at any angle, even when partially hidden, making it easier than ever to be detected.  Read More

The Netatmo Welcome, seen here at CES 2015, is a home security camera that recognizes the ...

Personal security cameras are already widely available to help us monitor activity at our homes. Most simply record what's happening, and cannot actively flag up any unusual activity. The Netatmo Welcome, however, uses facial recognition to provide alerts about who is in your house.  Read More

Facial recognition technology developed at the Fraunhofer Institute can detect human emoti...

Over a number of years, researchers at Germany's Fraunhofer Institute have developed software to measure human emotion through face detection and analysis. Dubbed SHORE (Sophisticated High-speed Object Recognition), the technology has the potential to aid communication for those with disabilities. Now the team has repurposed the software as an app for Google Glass, with a view to bringing its emotion-detecting technology to the world.  Read More

Nito maps and tracks the user's face, to create an avatar that matches their voice and mov...

Have you ever wished you were an alien or a shark? Well, sorry, but you're never going to get to be one. The free Nito app, however, does let you appear as those characters or others, in recorded 15-second videos. It tracks your facial features and movements as you talk, and reproduces them in real time via an animated avatar of your choice.  Read More

Umoove has developed innovative face tracking technology that allows users to navigate a g...

Giving new meaning to "tilt to steer," Israeli tech startup Umoove has developed face- and eye-tracking software for mobile devices that translates gentle head tilts and nods into in-game movements. The company has released the Umoove Experience, a free app for iOS that demonstrates the technology, but hopes third party developers will integrate the technology into their own titles on both iOS and Android devices.  Read More

An EyeSee shopper-watching mannequin

Do you ever get the creep feeling that store mannequins are ... watching you? Well, that feeling may now be justified. Italian display form company Almax has recently introduced its EyeSee line of mannequins, that are equipped with cameras and microprocessors in their heads.  Read More

Bryson Lovett has created Bird Photo Booth, which uses remotely controlled smartphones to ...

Taking a close-up photograph of a bird is no easy task without high-end photo equipment and the patience of a trainspotter. By combining the power of smartphones, wireless technology and quality macro lenses, a KickStarter project called Bird Photo Booth promises to take bird photo enthusiasts a little closer to their subjects without ruffling anyone's feathers.  Read More

PredictGaze pauses the TV automatically when no one is watching (Photo: Shutterstock)

Imagine, if you will, that you are sitting around watching TV, and the sudden urge to grab a snack overtakes you. You try desperately to ignore it because you can't find the remote control, and the show you are watching is the single most gripping piece of entertainment you've ever witnessed. Hunger overtakes you, and you proceed to walk away and go to the kitchen. As you get up and leave, the TV pauses on its own. This is the idea behind new startup PredictGaze.  Read More

Sony is adding facial recognition software to Everquest II that will use a webcam to trans...

When it comes to online role playing games, communicating with other players sadly hasn't evolved much beyond using in-game text chats, attacking each other, and talking to someone whose microphone is too close to their face. Sony's forthcoming SOEmote technology however, promises gamers the ability to express themselves through their online characters in a way that's more like real life. Using any webcam to track facial expressions, head movements, and voices, anything from an elf to an anthropomorphic frog will be able to mimic a player's own actions in real-time.  Read More

A new video surveillance system is able to search through data on 36 million faces per sec...

Japan’s Hitachi Kokusai Electric has developed a surveillance system that can automatically detect a face in either a provided photo or video footage, then search for that same face in other video provided by networked cameras. While such facial recognition systems have been seen before, this one is able to compare the target face against others at an astounding rate of 36 million faces per second.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 31,353 articles
Editor's Choice
Product Comparisons