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Drones

Airspace open for business: US sets nationwide rules for commercial drones

Unless you're willing to jump through a few hoops to land yourself a special permit, flying a drone commercially in the US will land you in some pretty hot water with the authorities. But newly announced drone laws are set to clear the way for business-related drone flight across the nation, with the FAA taking its first significant steps towards integrating small unmanned aircraft into US airspace.Read More

Drones

US airports to put drone-disabling system to the test

There's a very good reason the airspace around airports is restricted. But the proliferation of consumer drones is making the job of policing these areas increasingly difficult and raising the prospect of these unmanned aircraft crashing into their commercial cousins. As part of its effort to stop drones flying too close to airports, the US government is trialing a defense system at select US airports that scans the area for unmanned drones before using radio beams to stop them in their tracks.Read More

Drones

NASA puts nationwide traffic control system for drones to the test

If even half of the businesses hankering to get drones into US airspace are successful, the skies will soon be a whole lot busier than they are today. Looking to avert gridlock at altitude, NASA has been working on an air traffic management system for drones and today is carrying out its first coordinated testing, looking to see just how well it accommodates flights at different locations across the country.Read More

Drones

Drone detection system exposes pilots flying dangerously close to airports

As hobby drones have wildly increased in popularity, so too has the need to keep pilots accountable. Following the launch of a mandatory drone registry last year, the US government is now exploring new technologies to detect drones flying too close to airports. Early testing has been labelled a success, and holds the promise of not just sniffing out rogue drones but the irresponsible people behind the joysticks as well. Read More

Drones

45,000 drones already logged with US registration database

Those looking to register their drones with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will have to wait until Christmas. Since launching its mandatory registry on Monday, some 45,000 drones have already been logged with the FAA's online database, which is now undergoing temporary maintenance to deal with an anticipated Christmas Day rush.Read More

Drones

Drones face mandatory registration in the US

The US Department of Transportation (USDoT) Secretary Anthony Foxx announced today that drones in the United States will soon require federal registration. As part of this effort, Secretary Foxx and FAA Administrator Michael Huerta are putting together a task force made up representatives from the government, along with the UAS and manned aviation industries to provide recommendations on how to best implement a registration process.Read More

Drones

Drone detection technology to watch over US airports

The Federal Aviation Administration has been vocal on the dangers of drone flight, evidenced by its painstaking approach to drafting new laws, public awareness campaigns and even a smartphone app. But its warnings can only go so far amid a flood of enthusiastic new drone owners itching to get their machines into the sky, so it is turning to technology to help ensure public safety. The agency has teamed up with private firm CACI to test out technology that detects drones and their pilots buzzing around airports, in hope of preventing potential collisions with manned aircraft. Read More

Drones

FAA beta testing B4UFLY smartphone app to keep drone pilots informed

Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), or drones, have quickly gained popularity with the public. And as is so often the case with rapidly advancing technologies, it can be hard for the public to know legally what they can and can't do with the technology – or in the case of drones, where they can and can't fly. To help dispel confusion surrounding drone flights, the US FAA is beta testing its B4UFLY smartphone app, which tells users about any restrictions on unmanned aircraft they might want to fly in a particular area.Read More

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