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FAA


— Drones

US government announces mandatory drone registration

If you're on the receiving end of one of the hottest gifts this holiday season, then the US federal government wants to know about it. After first flagging its intentions in October, the Federal Aviation Administration has today announced its drone database which requires owners of small unmanned aircraft to register their vehicles or face very steep penalties, which could include time in prison.

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— Drones

Drones face mandatory registration in the US

The US Department of Transportation (USDoT) Secretary Anthony Foxx announced today that drones in the United States will soon require federal registration. As part of this effort, Secretary Foxx and FAA Administrator Michael Huerta are putting together a task force made up representatives from the government, along with the UAS and manned aviation industries to provide recommendations on how to best implement a registration process.

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— Drones

Drone detection technology to watch over US airports

The Federal Aviation Administration has been vocal on the dangers of drone flight, evidenced by its painstaking approach to drafting new laws, public awareness campaigns and even a smartphone app. But its warnings can only go so far amid a flood of enthusiastic new drone owners itching to get their machines into the sky, so it is turning to technology to help ensure public safety. The agency has teamed up with private firm CACI to test out technology that detects drones and their pilots buzzing around airports, in hope of preventing potential collisions with manned aircraft.

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— Drones

FAA beta testing B4UFLY smartphone app to keep drone pilots informed

Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), or drones, have quickly gained popularity with the public. And as is so often the case with rapidly advancing technologies, it can be hard for the public to know legally what they can and can't do with the technology – or in the case of drones, where they can and can't fly. To help dispel confusion surrounding drone flights, the US FAA is beta testing its B4UFLY smartphone app, which tells users about any restrictions on unmanned aircraft they might want to fly in a particular area.

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— Drones

Flirtey cleared for take-off in first FAA-approved drone delivery service

One weekend each July, 1,500 people from rural area of Wise County, Virginia descend on the local fairgrounds for a once yearly medical clinic. Here they seek attention for unique conditions that go untreated for the rest of the year due to lack of access to proper healthcare. In years gone by, medical supplies would be brought into the town by truck, but this year things will be working a little differently. Startup Flirtey has teamed up with NASA to conduct an FAA approved exercise to deliver some of these items by drone. This is a good news for a startup trying to spread its wings, but even better news for rural folk who instead of waiting days for urgently needed medication will have their prescriptions filled in just half an hour. And as Flirtey CEO Matt Sweeney tells Gizmag, it could be the "Kitty Hawk" moment the drone delivery industry has been longing for.

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— Drones

FAA's new drone program goes above and beyond the line of sight

Amazon's ambitious plans to deliver small parcels by drones just took another little jump towards reality, with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) launching a new program to study the use of drones beyond the operator's line of sight. The initiative sees the agency team up with three companies to take drone technology forward, with the ultimate goal of hastening the safe integration of the vehicles into US airspace.

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— 3D Printing

GE announces first FAA approved 3D-printed engine part

We've only just begun to see the huge impact 3D-printing technology will have on manufacturing, and the aerospace industry is a prime example. Earlier this year we saw the first example of a 3D-printed jet engine, now GE has announced the first 3D-printed part certified by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for a commercial jet engine. The fist-sized T25 housing for a compressor inlet temperature sensor was fabricated by GE Aviation and will be retrofitted to over 400 GE90-94B jet engines on Boeing 777 aircraft. Read More
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