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Eye


— Health and Wellbeing

Video games replace eye patch to treat lazy eye

With video games having previously been found to improve decision making speeds and the brain's capacity to learn, scientists have now created challenging computer games with a fun element that significantly improved depth perception and binocular vision in people with a lazy eye. Unlike the traditional patch used to treat the condition, the video games encourage both eyes to work together. Read More
— Medical

Eye pressure-monitoring implant could save glaucoma patients from blindness

Currently, people with glaucoma must have their internal optic pressure (the pressure within their eye) regularly checked by a specialist. If that IOP gets too high, then steps need to be taken to lower it, before vision damage can occur. The problem is, the pressure can change quickly, potentially rising to dangerous levels between those checks. A new implant, however, could make it possible for patients to check their own IOP as often as they like, using their smartphone. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Involuntary eye movement may provide definitive diagnosis of ADHD

If a child who's simply very active is mistakenly diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), they can end up on pharmaceuticals such as Ritalin unnecessarily. The problem is, it can be quite difficult to determine if someone actually has ADHD, and misdiagnoses are common. Now, however, researchers from Tel Aviv University have announced that analyzing a patient's eye movements may be the key. Read More
— Medical

Wearable pupillometer could detect dangerous diabetic condition earlier

Diabetic autonomic neuropathy is a condition that can occur in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics, compromising the autonomic nerves that control the gastrointestinal system, the heart and other vital organs. Among other things, it can cause arrhythmias, fainting, incontinence and an increased risk of bacterial infections. Thanks to a device being developed in Taiwan, however, it may soon be possible to detect the condition earlier, thus limiting its effects. Read More
— Medical

Corneas regrown using human stem cells

Medical researchers working with human stem cells have discovered a way to improve regrowth of corneal tissue in the human eye. Using a molecule known as ABCB5 to act as an identifying marker for rare limbal stem cells, the researchers were able to use antibodies to detect ABCB5 on stem cells in tissue from donated human eyes and use them to regrow anatomically correct, fully functional human corneas in mice. Read More
— Medical

In-eye sensor to keep a watch on changes in intraocular pressure

The fluid pressure inside the eye, known as intraocular pressure (IOP), is an important metric for evaluating a person's risk of glaucoma. There are currently two different ways to measure IOP, both of which require a trip to the ophthalmologist. A prototype sensor developed by engineers at the University of Washington is designed to be placed permanently in a person's eye to track changes in eye pressure and more effectively manage the disease. Read More
— Science

Three-dimensional light-sensitive retinal tissue grown in lab

The eye is often compared to a camera, but although its basic design is as simple as an old-fashioned box Brownie, its detailed structure is more complex than the most advanced electronics. This means that, unlike simpler organs, studies of retinal disease rely heavily on animal studies, and treating such illnesses is extremely difficult. One ray of hope in the field comes from researchers at Johns Hopkins, who have constructed a functioning segment of a human retina out of stem cells that is able to respond to light. Read More
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