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Mobile Technology

The eyes have it for unlocking ZTE's Grand S3

Unlocking early smartphones was as simple as pushing a couple of buttons, which were conveniently pointed out by the phone itself. Thankfully, as the devices became repositories for more and more personal information, security in the form of passcodes and squiggles, along with voice and fingerprint sensors have become standard. Now eye scans have been added to the list in ZTE's flagship Grand S3 smartphone.Read More

Medical

Eyedrops may be replaced by stick-on nanowafers

As anyone who has ever used medicinal eyedrops will know, it's hard to get the things into your own eye. Soon, however, they could be replaced by tiny drug-containing polymer "nanowafers" that are applied to the eye like a contact lens. Those wafers would proceed to gradually dissolve, releasing medication throughout the day. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

SVOne turns the iPhone into an eye test kit

Is there anything smartphones can't do? Besides have taken over our lives as communication and entertainment hubs, a growing use of the devices is in eye healthcare. Guided by a socially-inclusive ethos, New York-based Smart Vision Labs has created a low-cost, portable iPhone-based gadget to help people in developing countries to diagnose vision problems.Read More

Medical

Eye pressure-monitoring implant could save glaucoma patients from blindness

Currently, people with glaucoma must have their internal optic pressure (the pressure within their eye) regularly checked by a specialist. If that IOP gets too high, then steps need to be taken to lower it, before vision damage can occur. The problem is, the pressure can change quickly, potentially rising to dangerous levels between those checks. A new implant, however, could make it possible for patients to check their own IOP as often as they like, using their smartphone. Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Involuntary eye movement may provide definitive diagnosis of ADHD

If a child who's simply very active is mistakenly diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), they can end up on pharmaceuticals such as Ritalin unnecessarily. The problem is, it can be quite difficult to determine if someone actually has ADHD, and misdiagnoses are common. Now, however, researchers from Tel Aviv University have announced that analyzing a patient's eye movements may be the key. Read More

Medical

Wearable pupillometer could detect dangerous diabetic condition earlier

Diabetic autonomic neuropathy is a condition that can occur in both type 1 and type 2 diabetics, compromising the autonomic nerves that control the gastrointestinal system, the heart and other vital organs. Among other things, it can cause arrhythmias, fainting, incontinence and an increased risk of bacterial infections. Thanks to a device being developed in Taiwan, however, it may soon be possible to detect the condition earlier, thus limiting its effects. Read More

Medical

Corneas regrown using human stem cells

Medical researchers working with human stem cells have discovered a way to improve regrowth of corneal tissue in the human eye. Using a molecule known as ABCB5 to act as an identifying marker for rare limbal stem cells, the researchers were able to use antibodies to detect ABCB5 on stem cells in tissue from donated human eyes and use them to regrow anatomically correct, fully functional human corneas in mice.Read More

Medical

In-eye sensor to keep a watch on changes in intraocular pressure

The fluid pressure inside the eye, known as intraocular pressure (IOP), is an important metric for evaluating a person's risk of glaucoma. There are currently two different ways to measure IOP, both of which require a trip to the ophthalmologist. A prototype sensor developed by engineers at the University of Washington is designed to be placed permanently in a person's eye to track changes in eye pressure and more effectively manage the disease.Read More

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