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Eye-tracking

Tobii's REX (Developer Edition pictured) brings eye-tracking capabilities to Windows 8 PCs

Over the past decade, Sweden’s Tobii has been working on adding eye-tracking technology to a mix of user inputs that includes keyboards, mice and touchpads and screens. After demonstrating its GAZE UI for Windows 8 at last year’s CES, the company is set to showcase its first eye-tracking consumer peripheral device which brings the GAZE functionality to any Windows 8 PC at CES 2013. By tracking their eye movements, the Tobii REX allows Windows 8 users to scroll, zoom, navigate and select using their peepers in conjunction with a mouse or touchpad.  Read More

Fraunhofer's OLED data glasses

Imagine that you’re a mechanic whose hands are covered in grease, and you’re trying to follow repair instructions. Every time you need to turn the page or advance the screen, you have to put down your tools and wipe your hands. That’s why scientists from the Fraunhofer Center for Organics, Materials and Electronic Devices Dresden (COMEDD) have developed glasses that allow the wearer to flip pages on a digital document using nothing but their eyes.  Read More

Researchers in the UK have found that an eye tracking measurement test can help detect ear...

As researchers look for better ways to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease in its early stages, one promising detection methodology to emerge is a simple eye tracking procedure developed by scientists at Lancaster University in conjunction with Royal Preston Hospital. The results of such tests can help flag initial signs of memory impairment that are associated with the onset of the disease.  Read More

Haier's prototype TV, with its eye-tracking sensor bar in the foreground

While IFA 2012 may be thought of primarily as a venue for electronics manufacturers to unveil their latest products, it’s also a chance for them to showcase technologies that they’re still developing. An example of the latter is the prototype eye-controlled TV, created by Chinese electronics firm Haier. We had a chance to try it for ourselves, on the trade show floor in Berlin.  Read More

New tech developed at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris enables people to write i...

Retaining the ability to communicate effectively can be one of the key challenges facing those who suffer a severe restriction in mobility. Conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) can reduce a persons capacity for voluntary movement to the eyes only, though even this is not always possible. When eye movement is possible however, it offers an opportunity for communication and expression, as previously highlighted by the Eyewriter project. New research conducted at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris may offer a further breakthrough in this area by enabling writing in cursive using only eye movements.  Read More

An experimental system allows a computer to determine whether or not a human speaker is ly...

If the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey taught us anything, it’s that computers know when we’re telling a lie. While that may not actually be the case for most computers in real life, it could be if they’re running a program created by scientists from the University at Buffalo. Building on a previous psychological study, the team produced software that allowed a computer to assess a speaker’s eye movements, to determine whether or not they were telling the truth in a prerecorded conversation. It turns out that the computer was able to correctly able to spot their lies with 82.5% accuracy. According to the researchers, a trained human interrogator only manages a success rate of about 65%.  Read More

Tobii introduced and demonstrated its latest eye control technology, called Gaze, at last ...

Eye control innovator Tobii introduced and demonstrated its latest eye control technology at last week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The Gaze interface for Windows 8 is said to take advantage of the operating system's large tile layout to offer users a superior interaction experience, that neither touch nor mouse alone can provide.  Read More

Senseye's technology uses the forward-facing camera on your smartphone to locate your eyes...

Could you one day control your smartphone by just looking at it? Tech company Senseye thinks so, and is developing the technology to do just that. The technology uses the forward-facing camera on your smartphone to locate your eyes and then estimate where you're looking on the screen. The computer-vision algorithms used are precise enough that your phone will be able to tell even what icon you're looking at, allowing you to open programs, or even control games.  Read More

Eye-tracking and eye control specialist Tobii has given Atari's classic Asteroids arcade g...

When I was a good bit younger, I wasted far too much of my spare time blowing up wave after wave of space rocks - and the occasional flying saucer - trying to get to the flip-over. Atari's most successful game, Asteroids, has now been given a futuristic make-over by eye-tracking and eye control specialist Tobii, developers of the impressive laptop prototype and the stand-alone PCEye system for Windows PCs. Built as a free-standing arcade game, EyeAsteroids players use only their eyes to aim and fire a laser at flying rocks and save the world from impending pulverization.  Read More

Luis Cruz's Eyeboard - an eye tracking computer interface for the disabled

This unique and worthwhile project was put together by a 17-year-old electronics and programming whiz from Honduras, of all places. The Eyeboard system is a low-tech eyeball-tracking device that allows users with motor disabilities to enter text into a computer using eye gestures instead of a physical interface. This kind of system is not unique - there's plenty of eye tracking interfaces out there - but Luis Cruz has figured out a way to build the full system into a set of glasses for less than US$300, putting easier communication within reach of users in developing countries. He's also releasing the software as open source to speed up development. Personally, I spent my year as a 17-year-old in a series of heroic failures trying to impress girls with my air guitar.  Read More

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