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Eye-tracking

VR

Virtual reality may find use in assessing sex offenders

People who have been charged with sexual offenses typically have to undergo psychotherapy in order to control their deviant impulses. According to researchers at the University of Montreal, virtual reality may provide the best method of determining if that therapy has indeed worked – before those offenders are released back into the public. Read More

Wearables

Fove head mounted display expands possibilities with eye-tracking technology

Back in 2011, Google filed a patent for an unlock system for Google Glass that would use eye-tracking technology. Tokyo-based startup Fove believes the combination of a head mounted display (HMD) and eye-tracking technology has far wider applications and is working on just such a device aimed at the consumer market. Microsoft apparently agrees, having accepted the company into its Ventures Accelerator in London earlier this month.Read More

Two-part system tracks body movement and gaze

In order to better study hand/eye coordination, scientists need to simultaneously keep track of what a test subject is looking at, along with what their body is doing – and a new system is designed to help them do so. It combines one company's eye-tracking glasses with another's motion capture system. Read More

Mobile Technology

Umoove controls smartphones with a nod and a wink

Giving new meaning to "tilt to steer," Israeli tech startup Umoove has developed face- and eye-tracking software for mobile devices that translates gentle head tilts and nods into in-game movements. The company has released the Umoove Experience, a free app for iOS that demonstrates the technology, but hopes third party developers will integrate the technology into their own titles on both iOS and Android devices. Read More

Computers

Eyes-on with Tobii's eye-tracking technology

We've been following the development of Tobii's impressive eye-tracking technology for several years now, but it looks like consumers may actually get a chance to try it out for themselves in the not too distant future. Thanks to a partnership with SteelSeries, an eye tracker specifically for gamers is set to hit the market later this year, but that still leaves the question of what the technology can actually bring to video games. Fortunately, we were able to catch up with Tobii CEO Henrik Eskilsson on the CES show floor and try it out for ourselves. Read More

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