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Exercise

— Health and Wellbeing

Active Desk lets you burn calories while checking your email

By - January 24, 2013 4 Pictures
Many of us sit at a desk for extended periods each day – and that has doctors worried. Researchers are beginning to understand the associated health risks triggered by sitting for long durations, and suggest that people need to stand up, walk, and generally be more active throughout their day. One way to get more exercise might be to try out the Active Desk, which combines a recumbent exercise bike with a work desk, allowing you to leisurely pedal off the pounds throughout the day. Read More
— Science

Telerehabilitation system allows people to do physiotherapy at home

By - January 15, 2013 1 Picture
Generally speaking, people tend to dislike doing the exercises that are part of physiotherapy. Not helping matters is the fact that in many cases, patients must travel to a clinic to perform those exercises under the supervision of a trained professional. Now, researchers from Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems FOKUS are developing a “telerehabilitation” system that allows patients to perform exercises at home or when out and about, while still receiving feedback from a physiotherapist. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

U.S. study quantifies the effects of exercise on life expectancy

By - November 19, 2012 1 Picture
The benefits of regular exercise are well known, but what exactly are you getting in return for your efforts? A research a collaboration between the U.S.-based Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the National Cancer Institute has attempted to answer this question by quantifying how much longer people live depending on the levels of exercise they engage in. Read More
— Space

NASA developing exoskeleton for astronauts and the earthbound

By - October 12, 2012 5 Pictures
What do astronauts on a mission to Mars and earthbound paraplegics have in common? Quite a bit, including the news that NASA is developing a robotic exoskeleton for both of them. Called the X1 Robotic Exoskeleton, it’s derived in part from NASA’s Robonaut 2 humanoid robot now undergoing trials aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The X1 uses robotic technology for a dual-use exoskeleton that has applications for both astronauts on long space missions and the walking impaired on Earth. Read More
— Sports

RipSurfer X lets you surf on the spot

By - September 24, 2012 3 Pictures
There’s no doubt that paddling a surfboard out to the breakers is a good source of upper body exercise. What a lot of non-surfers might not realize, however, is that balancing on a constantly-shifting board is also a great workout for the core muscle groups. Surfer and entrepreneur Mike Hartwick certainly realized it, which is why he created the RipSurfer X stationary surfboard trainer – while it’s far from being the world’s only balance trainer, it’s claimed to be unique in offering all the fitness benefits of real surfing. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

OfficeGym lets you work out at your desk

By - September 20, 2012 9 Pictures
Many of us now do most of our work sat at a desk staring at a computer screen for hours on end. While this an inevitable part of modern-day living, it does present certain challenges to our health and wellbeing. A sedentary lifestyle isn't recommended, but it's often difficult to motivate oneself to visit a gym or do any kind of physical exercise before or after a hard day at work. So, what about doing some physical exercise during work? Read More
— Science

"Exercise" shown to improve the performance of lab-grown muscle implants

By - July 17, 2012 1 Picture
We all know that you need to exercise if you want to develop your muscles. As it turns out, however, exercise also makes lab-grown muscle implants more effective when introduced to the body. Scientists from North Carolina’s Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have discovered that after being gently expanded and contracted, implants placed in lab animals were better able to stimulate new muscle growth than implants that were left “unexercised.” Read More
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