2015 Detroit NAIAS Auto Show

Exercise

The Loop gaming platform is comprised of the Loop Clip, motion bar, headphones and an open...

As technology has gained a reputation for drawing children indoors and keeping them there captivated by the latest Angry Birds update or building their Minecraft kingdom, we have seen a conscious effort from within the industry to counter the perception of technology as a facilitator of unhealthy childhood habits. Loop, from Pushstart Creative, is the latest effort in this growing trend, relying on movement tracking technology as a vehicle to promote physical activity.  Read More

The SpikeBoard uses a combination of switch kicking and 'spiking'

What happens when you combine Nordic skiing, stand-up paddle and switch-kick longboarding? You end up with a new method of transportation called SpikeBoarding, which requires a SkateBoard "Spike" and a specialized longboard.  Read More

The Eyes-Free Yoga software relies on the Kinect's skeletal tracking capabilities to provi...

Conventional yoga classes with an instructor up front demonstrating positions to the class aren't generally a viable option for the visually impaired, but a team of computer scientists from the University of Washington (UW) is set to open this healthy activity up to such users with the help of a Microsoft's Kinect.  Read More

iRiver's On audio headset

A lot of people like to monitor personal stats such as their heart rate while exercising, plus they also like listening to music at the same time. Usually, doing both involves wearing at least a couple of devices at once. iRiver's new On audio headset, however, plays back music and gathers biometric data ... in both cases, through the user's ear.  Read More

Kinetic's Rock and Roll cycle trainer, spotted by Gizmag at Interbike 2013

Ordinarily when you prop a bicycle onto a trainer, you're in for an experience akin to riding an exercise bike. But with its new Rock and Roll trainer, Kinetic is aiming to give riders a more authentic experience when riding, with its frame that allows the bicycle to sway as the rider trains.  Read More

What's wrong with this picture? Well, the cyclist is actually moving ahead by pedaling in ...

Although cycling is a great form of exercise, it does involve simply doing one thing over and over – rotating the legs forward. Bicycles like the Varibike have attempted to turn it into more of an overall workout, by getting the rider’s arms in on the action. biXe Italia, however, is taking another approach. Its namesake device reportedly allows riders to work different muscle groups, by pedaling forwards or backwards in order to move the bike forward.  Read More

MeMover is a new Danish design for personal mobility

A Danish design company is working on a new personal transportation device that combines the high-intensity workout offered by a step machine with the zip of a bicycle. It's called the Me-Mover, and it should be available next year.  Read More

Beer and sports are long-time cultural partners  (Photo: Shutterstock)

Beer is often quaffed in the aftermath of a day of sports in the fellowship of friends and neighbors. Unfortunately, while it may pick up the spirits and increase the celebratory feeling, the dehydration associated with alcohol consumption can lead to tiredness and cramping muscles. A new study by a group of Australian Public Health researchers shows that many of these ill effects can be lessened by adding a pinch of sodium to your beer.  Read More

The Varibike in action

Earlier this year, we heard about a proposed arm- and leg-powered bicycle known as the 4StrikeBike. At the time, we knew that if it were to reach production, it would be facing some competition from the existing Raxibo Hand-Tret-Velo. Now, it turns out that another arm-and-legger has also recently hit the market – it’s time to meet the Varibike.  Read More

The Scripps Research Institute has developed a drug that duplicates the benefits of exerci...

A drug known as SR9009, which is currently under development at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), increases the level of metabolic activity in skeletal muscles of mice. Treated mice become lean, develop larger muscles and can run much longer distances simply by taking SR9009, which mimics the effects of aerobic exercise. If similar effects can be obtained in people, the reversal of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and perhaps Type-II diabetes might be the very welcome result.  Read More

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