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Ethanol

— Automotive

Revenge Verde supercar - not just green in color

By - January 12, 2010 17 Pictures
Not even the recession can slow this supercar. The Revenge Verde is an American-made supercar that its designer believes has great export potential. The car is the result of Revenge's search for American-made supercar components, assembled in America, built for supercar enthusiasts – not just in America. Sourcing the “best from the best” parts helps keeps the price of this beast within reach of many muscle car owners – around US$200,000. Among the mid-engined Verde’s supercar features are three drive chain and power train options, including the Ford 605hp motor, the GM 638hp motor, or an HP2g V8 engine that runs on E-85 ethanol fuel and yet still impresses with its figures: 400hp, 0-60mph in 3.5 seconds, a top speed of 200mph+ while achieving an amazing 100mpg! Read More
— Environment

Four ways to turn an orange peel green

By - December 6, 2009 1 Picture
While studying the possibilities of waste recycling, researchers at a Swedish university have come up with an unlikely suspect for an alternative fuel source - the orange. Citrus waste is usually a complete write-off in the compost game because it contains an antibacterial substance which slows its breakdown, but the research team has discovered that these acidic skins have more uses than they receive credit for. Read More
— Environment

Trashing existing fuel sources could cut global emissions by 80%

By - September 30, 2009 1 Picture
If there’s one thing there seems to be an endless supply of, it's garbage. The idea of turning the trash that currently ends up in landfill into a fuel to combat the growing energy crisis and tackle carbon emissions isn’t new. Companies like Waste2tricity in the UK are already looking to convert waste from business and industry into clean electricity. Now scientists in Singapore and Switzerland have added credence to the idea, saying that replacing gasoline with biofuel derived from processed waste biomass could cut global emissions by 80%. Read More
— Environment

Biofuel versus bioelectricity, and the winner is…

By - May 20, 2009 1 Picture
Running vehicles on biofuels such as ethanol reduces CO2 emissions and offers a way to lessen the world's reliance on oil. While this sounds great from an environmental perspective, the energy required to produce the biofuel and the land clearing for crops that can result means biofuels aren’t necessarily the environmentally friendly solution they initially appear to be. Recognizing this, researchers have analyzed the best way to maximize the “miles per acre” from biomass and discovered that the far more efficient option is to convert the biomass to electricity, rather than ethanol. Another tick for the electric car. Read More
— Automotive

EBDI ethanol engines surpass gasoline engine efficiency

By - February 6, 2009 1 Picture
Automotive technology specialist Ricardo has revealed the development of technology that optimizes ethanol-fuelled engines to a level of performance that exceeds gasoline engine efficiency and approaches levels previously reached only by diesel engines. The technology, called Ethanol Boosted Direct Injection (EBDI), takes full advantage of ethanol’s best properties – higher octane and higher heat of vaporization – to create a renewable fuel scenario that is independent of the cost of oil. Read More
— Environment

Quantifying the benefits of biofuels

By - June 16, 2008 1 Picture
A team of researchers from the University of Washington researched the impact on soil fertility and effects on food supply when fuels based on crops such as corn and soybeans are mixed with fossil fuels. They discovered that the large amounts of energy required to grow corn and then convert it to produce ethanol had a net energy gain that was modest and that corn-based ethanol was the worst offender amongst the alternative energy fuels. Read More
— Environment

Researchers investigate hydrogen-producing algae farms

By - April 3, 2008 0 Pictures
April 4, 2008 Here’s a futuristic, car-related technology you won’t see in the next summer sci-fi blockbuster: the algae-powered automobile. Some varieties of the unicellular plant are being tweaked to produce of hydrogen, which can be used to power efficient, environmentally clean vehicles. Researchers at the US Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory believe that algae’s ability to grow pretty much anywhere will enable it to be the energy farm of the near future. Read More
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