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ETH Zurich

— Health and Wellbeing

Chairless Chair is the chair that you wear

By - August 21, 2014 3 Pictures
If you work somewhere such as a factory, warehouse, or restaurant kitchen, then you'll know how tiring it can be to stand for several hours at a time. Unfortunately, however, it isn't always practical or safe to carry a stool around with you wherever you go. That's why Swiss start-up noonee has created the Chairless Chair. Worn as an exoskeleton on the back of the legs, it lets you walk or even run as needed, but can be locked into a supporting structure when you go into a sitting position. Read More
— Science

Disney algorithm has asymmetrical objects in a spin

By - August 10, 2014 7 Pictures
Tops, yo-yos, and other spinning toys are amongst the oldest playthings created by man, with the earliest examples dating back to 3,500 BC. Paradoxically, they’re not very easy to make with their design requiring a lot of trial and error. One mistake and, instead of a pirouetting plaything, you get a clattering paperweight. That’s why spinning toys tend to be symmetrical – until now. In a blow for symmetry, Disney Research Zurich and ETH Zurich have developed a computer algorithm that can take any shape, no matter how cock-eyed, and make it spin like a top. Read More
— Medical

Fusion molecule found to cure rheumatoid arthritis in mice

By - August 6, 2014 1 Picture
While advances have been made in treating rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease causing inflammation of joints in the body, scientists are yet to develop a cure for the disease. But researchers from ETH Zurich, Switzerland have developed a new therapy that has shown to fully cure the condition in mice, leaving the team hopeful of commencing human trials as early as 2015. Read More
— Good Thinking

DrinkPure water filter shows promise for worldwide use

By - July 25, 2014 3 Pictures
It's no secret that hundreds of millions of people around the world have little or no access to drinkable water. While a number of projects are aimed at getting filtration systems to those people, many of those systems require electricity, contain costly materials such as silver, or treat the water at a slow rate. The low-cost DrinkPure filter, by contrast, is simply screwed onto the top of an existing bottle, and can purify approximately one liter (34 fl oz) of water per minute. Read More
— Computers

3D "joystick" for animation artists takes shape

By - June 28, 2014 1 Picture
Until recently, computer software animation developers had to manipulate characters by using their computer mouse to drag virtual limbs into poses one tedious, time-consuming key frame at a time. Now researchers at the Interactive Geometry Lab (IGL) at ETH Zurich have developed a whole new way of creating movement in virtual characters using 3D model "joysticks" that directly create shape and movement inputs. Read More
— Science

Added DNA could be used to authenticate premium olive oil

By - April 25, 2014 1 Picture
When most people think of counterfeit goods, they probably picture things like handbags or watches. In fact, there's also a huge market for knock-off high-end food products, such as extra-virgin olive oil. Scientists from Switzerland's ETH Zurich research group, however, have come up with a possible method of thwarting the makers of that bogus oil – just add synthetic DNA particles to the real thing. And yes, consumers would proceed to swallow those particles. Read More
— Electronics

ETH Zurich researchers create ultra-thin, flexible circuit

By - January 8, 2014 4 Pictures
Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich) have created clear, flexible electronic circuitry that is so thin it can sit upon the surface of a contact lens, or be wrapped around a human hair. The research, led by Dr. Giovanni Salvatore, could ultimately be used for implantable medical devices. One such potential application suggested by the team is a “smart contact lens” that could monitor intraocular pressure for glaucoma patients. Read More
— Mobile Technology

App turns smartphones into 3D scanners

By - December 5, 2013 1 Picture
Most of us have gotten used to smartphones replacing long-established devices such as cameras and music players. Soon, however, they might be taking over the duties of something that is itself an emerging technology – the 3D scanner. Researchers at ETH Zurich have created an app that allows an ordinary smartphone to capture and display three-dimensional models of real-world objects, for subsequent finessing or even 3D printing. Read More

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