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Epilepsy

Health & Wellbeing

Earpiece detects and warns of epileptic seizures

Timely detection of epileptic seizures is crucial in order to give the patient the care they need. Electroencephalography is only available in hospitals, but as the sensor market expands in tandem with mobile technology, it was only a matter of time until a small, portable system would be developed. We have already seen the Embrace smartwatch, and now a German consortium headed by a team of epileptologists at the University Hospital Bonn is working to launch a new consumer option in the near future.Read More

Medical

Implanted micropump could deliver epilepsy drugs right into the brain

A promising new treatment for epilepsy directly targets the nerve cells, deep within the brain, that cause seizures. The treatment uses an electronic micropump and an anticonvulsant drug to inhibit the relevant areas of the brain without affecting healthy brain regions. It has had promising initial results on mice in vitro and will now be tested on live animals.Read More

Medical

Surgical robot takes a cheeky approach to brain surgery

Conventional open surgery on the brain involves drilling openings in the skull through which to access the gray matter. But what if the part of the brain needing to be accessed is located at the bottom of the brain as is the case with treating severe epileptic seizures? Generally it means more drilling. Now engineers at Vanderbilt University have developed a surgical robot that uses an alternative point of entry – the cheek.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Silk brain implants could stop epilepsy from progressing

The group of neurological disorders known as epilepsy not only cause disruptive, alarming seizures, but those seizures also tend to increase in frequency and severity over time. While the majority of patients can gain some control of their condition via medication or surgery, approximately 30 percent cannot. Now, however, help may be on the way ... in the form of tiny pieces of silk implanted in the brain. Read More

Medical

One-time cell transplantation cures epilepsy in mice

Earlier this week we reported on a neurological implant that has been found to accurately predict the onset of epileptic seizures. But a discovery by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) could one day render such a device obsolete. By transplanting a specific type of cell into the brain, the researchers have been able to cure epilepsy in adult mice, with hopes a similar treatment could work in humans.Read More

Medical

Neurological implant accurately predicts likelihood of epileptic seizure

Epilepsy seizures can range from something as subtle as a passing localized numbness to something as noticeable and potentially dangerous as wild involuntary thrashing. While some people experience symptoms before a seizure that indicate one is about to occur, others have no warning at all. A new device that is designed to be implanted between the skull and the brain surface has been found to accurately predict epilepsy seizures in humans and can indicate the risk of a seizure occurring in the coming hours. Read More

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