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Environmentally-friendly

— Good Thinking

PPlanter public urinal processes pee using plants

If you live in a big city, then there are doubtless alleyways or alcoves you know of that always smell like pee. While it might help to install public urinals in these places, doing so involves a lot of work and expense. Porta Potties are one alternative, although Oakland, California-based Hyphae Design Laboratory has developed a more eco-friendly solution known as the PPlanter. It's a self-contained modular system, that uses bamboo to process the pee. Read More
— Architecture

Limpley Stoke Eco-House displays impressive approach to energy efficiency

British architectural firm Hewitt Studios LLP recently completed work on the 400 sq m (4,305 sq ft) UK-based Limpley Stoke Eco-House. Designed with a focus on sustainability and energy efficiency, the futuristic home features more green technology than you can shake a (sustainably-sourced) stick at, including rainwater collection, passive ventilation, solar power, and an EV charging point. Read More
— Environment

Biogasoline could be joining biodiesel at the pumps

By now, most people have at least a passing knowledge of biodiesel – it's diesel fuel made from plant or animal oils, as opposed to the more traditional and less eco-friendly petroleum. While it's a good choice for people with diesel-powered vehicles, those of us with gas-burning cars haven't been able to get in on the action ... although that may be about to change. Read More
— Environment

Researcher looks into wastewater zooplankton as biofuel feedstock

With dwindling non-renewable fuel sources creating an enormous energy challenge, the search is on to develop sustainable, renewable types of energy such as solar, wind and biofuel. One of the recent developments in this field comes from New York's Clarkson University, where new findings suggest that small organisms found in wastewater treatment lagoons could be used as biofuel feedstock. Read More
— Good Thinking

Denimite repurposes blue jeans into a "green" material

As evidenced by our friend carbon fiber, composite materials get a big boost in strength when fibers are part of the recipe. Examples include composites made with plastic, wood pulp, and flax fibers. Husband-and-wife design team Jen Carlson and Josh Shear have taken this concept to a funky new level, by using shredded old blue jeans to create a denim fiber composite known as Denimite. Read More
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