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Engine Technologies

— Aircraft

GE announces first FAA approved 3D-printed engine part

By - April 19, 2015 5 Pictures
We've only just begun to see the huge impact 3D-printing technology will have on manufacturing, and the aerospace industry is a prime example. Earlier this year we saw the first example of a 3D-printed jet engine, now GE has announced the first 3D-printed part certified by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for a commercial jet engine. The fist-sized T25 housing for a compressor inlet temperature sensor was fabricated by GE Aviation and will be retrofitted to over 400 GE90-94B jet engines on Boeing 777 aircraft. Read More
— Science

Stainless magnesium breakthrough bodes well for manufacturing industries

By - August 29, 2013 2 Pictures
Magnesium alloys are very attractive for a range of weight-sensitive applications. They have the largest strength-to-weight ratio of the common structural metals, are lighter than aluminum and are particularly favored for being easy to machine and for their ability to be die cast to net shape. Unfortunately, magnesium alloys tend to corrode too easily. A team at Monash University in Australia has now discovered a novel and potentially game-changing approach to the problem: poisoning the chemical reactions leading to corrosion of magnesium alloys by adding a dash of arsenic to the recipe. Read More
— Space

3D-printed rocket parts stand up to the heat in NASA hot-fire tests

By - July 28, 2013 4 Pictures
3D printing technology has already made the move from engineering workshop to the home, and now it's set to make its mark in space. NASA has hot-fire tested 3D-printed rocket engine components, which have managed to withstand incredibly high temperatures and pressures to the same standard as traditionally manufactured parts. Being cheaper and faster to produce, 3D-printed parts have the potential to revolutionize the manufacturing of rocket engine components and save the space agency considerable time and money. Read More

Gasoline-powered diesel-like engine could boost fuel economy by 50 percent

With both gasoline and diesel engines having their own particular advantages and disadvantages, automotive component manufacturer Delphi is looking for a best-of-both-worlds solution with a gasoline-powered engine that uses diesel engine-like technology for increased fuel efficiency. According to MIT’s Technology Review, such an engine has the potential to increase the fuel economy of gasoline-powered cars by 50 percent and give hybrid vehicles a run for their money in the fuel economy stakes. Read More
— Motorcycles

Teaser photos and video: the 2011 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R

By - July 8, 2010 3 Pictures
Here it is – the new ZX-10R. The bike that lured MotoGP race-winner Chris Vermeulen into the worst team in the WSBK paddock; the bike that both Vermeulen and Kawasaki believe will put Kawasaki back at the front of the Superbike grid. All we have at this stage is a few photos of the race Superbike version and a teaser video, but expectation has been building that the new Ninja could be the first Japanese bike to take it to the amazing new BMW S1000RR. Numbers like 200 brake horsepower and a wet weight under 200kg have been floating around for the streetbike version. We know that there's going to be some form of traction control, which puts the Kwaka into a small but growing class of sports machines, and most interestingly, patents have been spotted that indicate that Kawasaki is thinking about running a proper long-bang style engine configuration, complete with an additional electric motor to keep the crank spinning in between pulses at lower speeds. Certainly, upon its release this will be Kawasaki's most significant motorcycle in many years. Read More
— Automotive

Gizmag talks to the men behind the Revenge Verde Supercar

By - February 24, 2010 1 Picture
The Revenge Verde is an American-made supercar using “the best of the best” parts sourced from a range of supercar manufacturers. The mid-engined Verde offers three drive chain and power train options, including an HP2g V8 engine that runs on E-85 ethanol fuel and produces 400hp, goes from 0-60mph in 3.5 seconds with a top speed of 200mph+, while achieving an amazing 100mpg. We had a chance to chat with Peter Collorafi, the CEO/President of Revenge Design Inc, as well as Doug Pelmear, CEO of HP2g to find out more about the car's development. Check out in our video after the jump. Read More
— Automotive

Jaguar's Gas Turbine Electric Vehicle Project wins funding

By - January 27, 2010 2 Pictures
The UK government-backed Technology Strategy Board recently announced the recipients of carbon reduction technology research project funding which sees a consortium made up of Jaguar Land Rover, SR Drives and led by Bladon Jets taking a GBP 1,103,392 (about US$1,790,000) slice of the multi-million GB-pound cake to develop "the world’s first commercially viable - and environmentally friendly - gas turbine generator designed specifically for automotive applications." Read More
— Automotive

Honda cracks snack-sized P-NUT concept at LA Auto Show

By - December 3, 2009 4 Pictures
With the variety of different engine technologies emerging to replace the traditional internal combustion engine, Honda has taken a very smart approach with its Personal-Neo Urban Transport (P-NUT) ultra-compact vehicle. The concept car features a modular rear engine bay designed to accommodate a wide variety of potential powertrain technologies including a conventional small internal combustion engine, a hybrid system, or a battery-electric drivetrain. Read More
— Automotive

Diesel used as gasoline 'spark plug' improves economy and emissions

By - August 11, 2009 1 Picture
The two engine technologies tend to be regarded as completely separate, so we rarely contemplate how gasoline and diesel can work together. But, in a series of tests conducted at the University of Wisconsin, scientists have used an engine’s fuel injection to produce the optimal diesel-gas mix for any given moment. The results are impressive: an average 20% greater fuel efficiency; combustion temperatures reduced by up to 40%; and effortless meeting of the stringent EPA 2010 emission regulations. Plus, the researchers believe that if their findings were implemented into every gasoline and diesel engine in the US, the savings could be as great as 4 million barrels of oil daily. Read More
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