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Emissions Control

— Automotive

Elektrobay: EV recharging infrastructure expanding in the UK

By - July 29, 2008 4 Pictures
The number of electric and hybrid vehicles on the road is growing rapidly in response to rising petrol prices and climate change awareness. As with any alternative to petroleum based transport, the key issue is infrastructure, or lack of it. Already rolling-put in the UK, Elektromotive's solution for drivers of electric cars and motorcycles is an on-street recharging network called “Elektrobay” that allows you to re-charge while away from home. Read More
— Environment

Cow Power potential is no bull

By - July 24, 2008 4 Pictures
A study published in the Institute of Physics’ Environmental Research Letters section today claims that by converting livestock manure to biogas, the United States could reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and generate up to 108.8 billion kW h – 2.9% of the country’s total electricity requirement. Read More
— Aircraft

Geared Turbofan engine cuts emissions and running costs

By - July 6, 2008 3 Pictures
July 6, 2008 Pratt & Whitney’s Geared Turbofan demonstrator engine has been cleared for flight-testing. By incorporating a gearbox system into the engine, aircraft can achieve a 12% reduction in fuel burn and CO2 emissions, a 50% reduction in NOx emissions, and a 50% reduction in engine noise. The GTF engine has been chosen by Mitsubishi to power the company’s Regional Jet (scheduled to enter service in 2013), and the upcoming Bombardier CSeries. Read More
— Automotive

Gordon Murray's T.25 car reaches halfway development milestone

By - July 6, 2008 4 Pictures
Gordon Murray Design’s T.25 concept car has reached the halfway point in development, with the first prototype build scheduled to begin in early 2009. Though Murray, (the brains behind the McLaren F1 road car), has remained tight-lipped about the specifics, he is adamant about delivering a small car that will be more cost-effective at every stage: cheaper to produce, purchase and run. Read More
— Automotive

Mazda's plans for a greener future

By - June 24, 2008 3 Pictures
June 25, 2008 Mazda has committed to cutting the fuel consumption of its vehicles by an average of 30% by 2015. The company is exploring a combination of fuel-cutting initiatives, including the development of lighter-weight technologies aimed at reducing vehicle weight by 100 kilograms from 2011, carbon neutral bioplastics, an Idle Stop system and an advanced version of the emissions-reducing Three Layer Wet Paint System fist introduced in 2005. Integral to the plan is the renewal of its entire powertrain lineup by 2015, with tests of its hydrogen hybrid system continuing ahead of plans for release in Japan in the coming fiscal year, as well as plans for a new gasoline rotary engine and new diesel engines. Read More
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