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Emergency

Science

Homeland Security envisions devices for first responders of the future

The United States Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) has pulled out its crystal ball to look 20 years into the future. In this case, the ball is made of focus groups and the future is that of technologies available to first responders a generation from now. The idea is to anticipate the needs of first responders to make sure that the appropriate technology is available to meet future disasters and terrorist attacks.Read More

Medical

Helmet-mountable ICEdot Crash Sensor calls for help if you can’t

A helmet might provide protection to the head in the event of an accident, but that doesn’t necessarily mean the wearer won’t be knocked unconscious or otherwise incapacitated. The ICEdot Crash Sensor pairs to a smartphone to automatically send a call for help, complete with GPS coordinates, when an accident is detected. The system also provides first responders with the accident victim’s medical information.Read More

Mobile Technology

Mobile app turns smartphones into “virtual radios” for first responders

In an emergency, every second counts, and communication between various emergency services and government agencies can be of critical importance. While proven to be effective, current systems such as Land Mobile Radio (LMR) can still leave gaps in the lines of communications. However, a new mobile app developed by U.S. defense contractor and industrial corporation Raytheon aims to close some of those gaps by enabling first responders to communicate without LMR. The app is part of the company's Interoperability Communications Suite which aims to enhance interoperability between LMR radios, landline, VoIP phones, and P25 systems via ISSI, and 4G/LTE. Read More

Automotive

Europe making Autonomous Emergency Braking tech compulsory in new cars

The European Commission plans to make Autonomous Emergency Braking systems (AEBs) a mandatory requirement in all new vehicles on the Continent by 2014. These systems typically use one or a combination of radar, lidar or video-recognition technologies to measure the distances between vehicles, warn drivers if they get too close, and to then engage the brakes if the driver fails to take any action.Read More

Health & Wellbeing

Portable cooling vests could save cardiac arrest victims from brain damage

Lowering the body’s core temperature has been shown to decrease the likelihood of neurological damage in the event of oxygen deprivation. In a process known as “therapeutic hypothermia,” hospital medical staff will routinely administer chilled water blankets or insert cold drip catheters, in order to protect patients who have just experienced a cardiac arrest or stroke. What can be done, however, when someone has a heart attack far from a hospital? Well, in the near future, bystanders may be able to suit them up with a cooling vest – possibly saving them from permanent brain injury. Read More

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