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— Music

The Uda makes electronic music with a twist

Among the many sounds emanating from the Tokyo Make Meeting 05 this past weekend was the unusually shaped electronic instrument, the Uda. It's played with two hands, and looks like it might be a less-flexible cousin of the accordion. Notes are played by pressing different sections of a rope that's coiled around the device, on both the right and left sides. Exactly where you touch it determines the pitch, and there's a one octave difference between one row of rope and the adjacent row. Read More
— Good Thinking

iSOCO electronic invoicing exchange could save 30 percent of processing costs

It's a universal problem - one you may be surprised to hear we still face in today's technological age: you send me an invoice with your software, my software can't read it so I waste time and money interpreting it. iSOCO promises to change all that with its new prototype i20nt. This system aspires to become the first to exchange electronic invoices between companies transparently and regardless of their originating format and system, saving up to 30% of the total invoice processing costs. Read More
— Around The Home

Personalize your showering experience – even remotely – with the Moen ioDIGITAL

Currently, your iPod might have your favorite songs personalized the way you like them and your laptop might be customized with your own homepage material. But what about your shower or bath? Do they know what you like? An easy-to-use interface for your bathroom is now available from Moen that gives you the ability to set and maintain water temperature, levels and flow with electronic precision – even remotely. The ioDIGITAL is available for three Moen products: the vertical spa, shower and Roman tub. Read More
— Electronics

Consumers in emerging economies twice as likely as developed economies to buy consumer technology this year

Despite the reputation that First-World populations have for consumerism, a new study has shown that citizens of emerging countries are twice as likely to purchase and use consumer technology within the next year. They are also more willing to pay a premium for environmentally-friendly consumer electronics, and value innovative new products over brand loyalty. The study was conducted by Accenture, a global management consulting firm, and its findings will have profound implications for the consumer tech marketplace. Read More
— Bicycles

Cannondale presents Simon, the electronic one-legged suspension fork

After five years of development, Cannondale has unveiled a new proof-of-concept prototype that could revolutionize bicycle suspension. Called Simon, it’s the newest member of their offbeat Lefty line of one-legged shock forks. According to Cannondale, Simon’s onboard microprocessor will allow users to customize their ride like never before. If that isn’t enough, it can also send the fork from being fully-open to fully-closed in just six milliseconds. Read More
— Inventors and Remarkable People Feature

Feature: Decoding Bletchley Park's history

At first glance, even second glance, Bletchley Park could easily be just another beautiful British building deserving of some loving care and attention. But for many years its walls guarded one of the best kept secrets of the 20th Century. During the Second World War it was the top secret home to the cryptanalysts, mathematicians and military personnel later credited with shortening the war by at least two years and saving millions of lives by breaking the secret ciphers used in Nazi communications. Seventy years after war was declared on Germany, Gizmag's Paul Ridden takes a closer look at what went on at HMS Pembroke V, the people who worked there and talks to some of the those now dedicated to ensuring that its legacy lives on. Read More