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Electronic

Computers

All-optical permanent on-chip memory paves the way for faster, more efficient computers

A new non-volatile optical memory has been created by researchers working at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the universities of Münster, Oxford, and Exeter. Utilizing innovative phase-change materials to store information, the new device promises to significantly improve processing speeds by effectively eliminating the existing bottleneck of having to convert optical signals into electrical signals for storage and then back again for transmission.Read More

Fully-flexible touchscreen wristband slated for 2016 launch

Wearables, to be true to their name, should ideally be devices that are comfortable and easy to wear, like a snug scarf or a soft pair of socks. But many devices laying claim to the wearable tag don't quite meet this brief. The Wove Band could be an exception. Billed as the "world's first flexible touch display," the design combines a flexible E Ink display with a proprietary digital fabric developed by Chicago-based Polyera over a ten year period.Read More

Military

DARPA sees future in vacuum tubes

In today's world, vacuum tubes or radio valves seem as dead as high button shoes and buggy whips, but DARPA sees them as very much the technology of the future. As part of a new program, the agency is looking to develop new tube designs and manufacturing techniques for use in tomorrow's high-powered communications and radar systems.Read More

Electronics

New molecular transistor can control single electrons

Researchers from Germany, Japan and the United States have managed to create a tiny, reliable transistor assembled from a single molecule and a dozen additional atoms. The transistor reportedly operates so precisely that it can control the flow of single electrons, paving the way for the next generation of nanomaterials and miniaturized electronics.Read More

Materials

Compound discovery sets stage for speedier electronic devices

A discovery at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids could pave the way for further leaps forward in the speed of electronic systems. The finding that a material called niobium phosphide dramatically increases its resistance in a magnetic field could lead to faster, higher-capacity hard drives and other electronic components.Read More

Electronics Review

Review: Cubit programmable "make anything" electronic platform

If you’re into electronics as a hobbyist, technician, or professional engineer, you know that you can spend many hours designing circuits, sourcing components, and breadboarding or soldering a project all together before you find out if your creation actually works. Wouldn’t it make life simpler if you could just start with a basic, multi-function controller and a few plug and play peripherals to get something – anything – up and running straight away and then which you could tweak and add to as you go? The makers of a new electronic design tool thought that this would be a good idea too and have created Cubit, a make anything platform that allows drag and drop software control over snap together hardware. Join Gizmag as we try a few builds to test out it out.Read More

3D Printing

Industrial Revolution III 3D printer places electronics within the objects it creates

The development of 3D printer technology has been rapidly accelerating, boosted in a large part to the open source community and world-wide sharing of information. There are now literally dozens of brands of 3D printers on the market at all price points, but Buzz Technology Limited, out of London, is looking to stand out from the crowd with its Industrial Revolution III printer (or IR3 for short) that can embed wiring within plastic components using conductive material. Read More

Electronics

World's first light-activated, molecule-sized switch gets turned on

In the pursuit of ever-shrinking circuitry for nanotechnology electronics, increasingly smaller devices and components are being developed. Now researchers at the University of Konstanz and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) claim to have micro-miniaturized the humble electrical switch all the way down to molecule size and proven its operation for the very first time. Unable to flick such a tiny switch mechanically, however, the researchers instead used light to turn it on. Read More

Electronics

New multiferroic film could lead to more bendable electronics

Researchers from South Korea have developed a thin, highly-flexible film that could enable a new generation of wearable devices that wrap around your finger or wrist. The multiferroic film even amplified the properties inherent in the bismuth ferrite it was made from, and the enhanced properties were preserved when the film was curved into a cylindrical shape.Read More

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