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Electric Vehicles


— Automotive

TOSA electric buses use computer models to control costs

By - June 19, 2014 3 Pictures
It’s one thing to invent an electric bus, a hydrogen car, or other green transportation technology, but quite another for it to work in the real world. For example, the Trolleybus Optimisation Système Alimentation (TOSA) flash-charging electric bus system may be the most brilliant idea ever, but if it can’t stay in the black, then might as well be drawn by diesel-powered horses. Scientists at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) are hoping to avoid that scenario by developing a computer model that helps engineers integrate the buses into existing transport systems while keeping costs down. Read More
— Aircraft

GF7 car design could legally hit 550 mph – in the sky

Greg Brown and Dave Fawcett are working on an design that they hope will yield something we've spent decades waiting for – a flying jet-propelled car. A sleek cross between a business jet with a luxury automobile, the GF7 drives on electric motors while on the ground, then can extend wings and use a 3,500-lb thrust jet engine to fly to 38,000 ft (12,000 m) and speeds of 550 mph (885 km/h). The (obvious) catch: if this ambitious project does get of the ground, it won't come cheap. Read More
— Urban Transport

Movpak fits an EV into a backpack

By - May 27, 2014 8 Pictures
Gizmag has covered several potential solutions to "last-mile transportation" that aim to help people get from, say, the train station to the office, or the bus stop to home. The latest such transportation device to come to our attention is the Movpak: an electric skateboard-like EV that fits into a backpack, and still leaves some room for carrying stuff. Read More
— Automotive

Meyers Manx celebrates 50 years with electric dune buggy

By - May 23, 2014 13 Pictures
Fifty years ago, in the heyday of American surf culture, Californian Bruce Meyers created one of the most important off-road vehicles of all time. The lightweight fiberglass Meyers Manx helped to cement the dune buggy trend of the 1960s and inspire competitive off-road racing. The original Manx became just the second vehicle to find a place on the newly formed U.S. National Historic Vehicle Register this year, and it celebrates its 50th anniversary this month. As part of the ongoing celebration, Meyers has introduced the Manx V, an electric-powered dune buggy optimized for the 21st century. Read More
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