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Eindhoven University

Medical

Sweat sensor uses battery-free, plant-like pump

A sensor under development by researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) in the Netherlands takes inspiration from how plants draw water out of the earth. Designed to take medically useful readings from patient sweat, the sensor doesn't require any form of external power.Read More

Electronics

Tiny temperature sensor powered wirelessly with radio waves

One of the problems for the smart buildings of tomorrow is that they may depend on some very un-smart wires to power them. To cut the cord, Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) researcher Hao Gao, as part of his PhD thesis, is developing a tiny transmitting temperature sensor that is powered by radio waves to eliminate the need for wires or batteries. Instead, it picks up radio waves from a special router, converts them into electricity, and uses it to transmit readings.Read More

Materials

Gallium phosphide nanowires boost hydrogen yield in prototype solar fuel cell

One of the most promising forms of artificial photosynthesis involves using solar energy to split liquid water to produce oxygen and hydrogen gas, which can be stored and used as a clean fuel. And one of the most promising semiconductor materials for such a task is gallium phosphide (GaP), which can convert sunlight into an electrical charge and also split water. Unfortunately, the material is expensive, but researchers have now used a processed form of gallium phosphide to create a prototype solar fuel cell that not only requires 10,000 times less of the precious material, but also boosts the hydrogen yield by a factor of 10.

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Telecommunications

Breaking the speed record: Multi-core optical fibers achieve 255 Tbps

Researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology and the University of Central Florida have developed a new fiber optics cable capable of transmitting the contents of over 5,000 DVDs in a single second – a speed six times greater than the previous record. The advance could help us reach petabit-per-second speeds over the next few years, which will be crucial for keeping up with growing bandwidth demands.Read More

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