more top stories »


— Health and Wellbeing

Thought-controlled implant creates proteins on demand

Wouldn't it be great if there were implants that detected the brainwaves associated with conditions such as chronic headaches or epilepsy, and then responded by triggering genes in the patient's body to produce a protein that treated the condition? Well, scientists at the ETH Zurich research institute are on their way to making it happen. They've developed an implant that causes genetically-modified cells to express a specific protein, and the device is indeed activated by brain waves. Read More
— Science

Electric "thinking cap" helps people learn from their mistakes

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has become a widely used technique for reaching into a person's brain and altering the way in which it functions. Vanderbilt psychology Professor Geoffrey Woodman and graduate student Robert Reinhart have just published the results of a new study in the Journal of Neuroscience in which they found that tDCS stimulation of the mediofrontal cortex for a period of minutes can change one's ability to recognize and learn from error for a period of several hours. Read More
— Wearable Electronics

Lucid dreaming made easier with the Aurora EEG headband

Lucid dreaming is believed by many to aid in practicing skills, improving creativity, or just exploring adventurous new worlds, but requires practice and awareness to master. Aurora is an EEG-based headband aiming to enhance dreams and lower the barrier to lucid dreaming. With apps for multiple platforms, a host of features, and an open API for third party applications, iWinks' aim is to help the uninitiated take control of their dreams. Read More
— 3D Printing

3D-printed EEG headset from OpenBCI is customizable and open-source

When Gizmag wrote about OpenBCI, a brain-computer interface system with open-source software, the company was waiting to announce an EEG headset it claimed would be entirely new. A few days later, the OpenBCI board is fully funded and we’ve seen how the team will implement a customizable and modular 3D-printed headset with open-source availability. The design not only showcases the utility of 3D printing, but more importantly demonstrates the company’s commitment to creating an open community around their product. Read More
— Medical

"Virtual reality hands" mind-control therapy for stroke patients

Earlier this year, we saw an amazing demonstration of an EEG skullcap interface that allowed a quadcopter to be controlled with only thoughts. Now the same technology is pioneering a medical therapy in which stroke patients can use their thoughts to guide a simulation, and thus rebuild damaged neurons. As the “virtual reality hands” provide customization and direct feedback of one’s progress, this could be an improvement over traditional therapy methods. Read More