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Education

— Science

3D-printed body parts designed for teaching anatomy

By - July 15, 2014 2 Pictures
While we might not hear much about a "worldwide shortage of cadavers," the fact is that in developing nations and other places, they are in short supply. It costs money to properly embalm and otherwise prepare the bodies, plus they need to be kept refrigerated, and they can only be dissected under strictly-regulated conditions. A team from Australia's Monash University, however, has developed what could be the next-best thing – highly-realistic 3D-printed cadaver body parts. Read More
— Children

Tech to help busy parents keep the kids occupied

By - June 20, 2014 21 Pictures
With an abundance of kid-oriented tablets and high-tech toys, children have more reasons than ever to stay fixed firmly to the couch. While the popularity of Angry Birds and Minecraft speaks volumes for video entertainment's ability to engage, the gadgets that inspire beyond the screen perhaps don't get quite the same fanfare. With this in mind, Gizmag has rounded up some top tech to help keep youngsters occupied. Read More
— Children

Printeer 3D printer brings kids' creations to life

By - June 17, 2014 8 Pictures
With 3D printers becoming more commonplace, it was maybe just a matter of time before they threatened crayons and Lego as favorite playthings for the creative child. At the forefront of this intersection of education, technology and playtime is the manufacturing company Mission Street Manufacturing, whose Printeer 3D printer promises to bridge the gap between technical know-how and your child's imagination. Read More
— Music

Moog's Werkstatt-Ø1 synth enjoys extremely limited release

By - June 9, 2014 4 Pictures
For the first time since 1997, Moog engineers held a two-day workshop at the annual Moogfest festival in North Carolina. An educational, patchable analog synthesizer named Werkstatt-Ø1 was created for the event, and 125 participants were given the assistance needed to build the device for themselves. In the weeks following Moogfest, the company received a number of requests to make the Werkstatt more widely available. Moog has responded by offering a "no soldering required" version of the kit for limited release. Read More
— Computers

Who needs humans? Computers used to teach other computers

By - April 2, 2014 1 Picture
While it may be getting easier for humans to teach robots how to perform new tasks, there's still one potential problem – when a new robot is introduced to a work environment, its user may have to teach it the task over again, from scratch. That might soon no longer be the case, however. Researchers at Washington State University have devised a method by which computers can teach each other, freeing humans from having to do so. Read More
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