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— Good Thinking

Move-it: recyclable, removable cardboard parts that turn a box into a trolley

How do you get a heavy box across town without using a delivery truck, car or taxi? That’s where the Move-it could help – it’s a cleverly designed kit, made of self-adhesive cardboard parts that stick on your box and transform it into a lightweight trolley. And would you believe it’s entirely made of cardboard – including the wheels, axle and chassis? Read More
— Good Thinking

The SeaKettle life raft will make drinking water from the sea

The thought of folks suffering from extreme dehydration whilst stranded in a life raft at sea got industrial designer Kim Hoffman thinking of a way to turn all that sea water into safe, drinkable, life-saving refreshment. She took inspiration from portable desalination tools and created the Sea Kettle concept, a colorful life raft that uses heat from the sun to evaporate salty water and collect condensed run off in containers within the raft's structure. Read More
— Good Thinking

Ribbon ceiling fan design based on a three-dimensional helical loop

Bored with your plain old ceiling fan, with its old school, conservative straight blades? Perhaps what you need is the Ribbon. A one-off exercise from Australian industrial designer Ben McMahon, the Ribbon not only looks radically different than traditional fans, but is also claimed to be much more effective at air circulation. The designer obviously believes his invention has potential, as he has entered it in this year’s James Dyson Awards. Read More
— Around The Home

Dyson expands bladeless fan line

The Dyson Air Multiplier fan released late last year has some new stablemates. The company's expanded range includes a larger diameter table fan, a tower fan and a pedestal model. None of the offerings in the range come cheap, but they all include the distinctive bladeless design that Dyson says delivers better airflow as well as making them safer for curious little fingers and easier to clean than their bladed counterparts. Read More
— Bicycles

Firefly bike light detects traffic and lights you up for greater visibility

Many people want to do their bit to help save the planet, or to simply get fit, by riding a bike instead of using their vehicle. However, traveling on the road when the sun goes down can be off-putting for fear of not being seen by motorists. The Firefly light has been designed to address this concern by making them more visible. It uses a passive Infrared sensor to detect traffic approaching from behind the rider and projects light from flashing LEDs onto the back of the rider with varying intensity depending on the proximity of the traffic. The Firefly light is another shortlisted design submission in our ongoing series of the Australian Design Awards - James Dyson Award 2010. Read More
— Around The Home

Dyson DC31: looks cool and sucks at the same time

Looking more like a power tool that just transported from the Starship Enterprise, the latest hand-held vacuum from Dyson has a 10-minute battery life and a digital V2 motor that delivers constant, strong suction - ideal for small cleaning tasks around the home or in a car, boat or caravan. The DC31 has a dual power mode that gives the operator a six-minute burst of power for higher suction at the flick of a switch. Dyson demonstrated its two models, the DC31 and the DC31 Animal to our team at IFA this month, and gave Gizmag's Kate Seamer an exclusive interview. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Dyson energy bracelet a good call

How many times has your cell phone run out of juice in the middle of an important call? Too many. A team of designers, however, thinks it may have come up with a way of generating enough electricity to jolt your cell phone’s dead battery back to life to finish that all-important call – an energy bracelet that uses body heat and ambient temperature. Read More
— Urban Transport

The fast-folding Switch Commuter Bike

Using pedal-power to get to work makes sense - get fit, reduce your carbon footprint, save money and probably time too - but for many cyclists, negotiating the urban sprawl often means using other forms of transport like trains for part of the journey. That's where the folding bike comes in. We've seen some cracking designs in recent times that incorporate large wheels and make the bike easier to handle when folded, and this award winning example from student designer Robert Dumaresq ticks all the boxes. Called the Switch Commuter Bike, Dumaresq's lightweight, fast-folding design takes up only the footprint of one wheel when collapsed so it can easily be maneuvered in crowded environments. Read More