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— Outdoors

Accordion-style Hydaway water bottle folds down into a flat disc

Over the years, one of the biggest trends we've seen in water bottle design is the collapsible bottle that compacts down to pocket size when empty. It's appeared in rollable Vapur bottles, crushable Hydrapak bottles and scrunchable Bübi bottles. The Hydaway offers a slightly different take on the trend, its silicone body compacting like an accordion into a flat, pocketable disc. Read More
— Telecommunications

Smart whiskey bottle talks to smartphones

Diageo, the alcohol giant behind popular poisons like Smirnoff and Baileys, has teamed up with electronics company Thinfilm Electronics to develop a Johnnie Walker Blue Label smart whiskey bottle. The prototype connected bottle promises to enable distributors to better track stock as well as connect with user's smartphones and detect when someone has cracked it open prematurely. Read More
— Medical

Resveratrol in red wine could help cut alcohol-related cancer risk

With the festive season upon us, many people will indulge in more alcohol than usual. The health risks of binge drinking (and embarrassing Christmas party behavior) aside, alcohol consumption is also a major risk factor for some cancers, including head, neck, esophageal, liver, breast and colorectal cancer. However, in a spot of good news, a recent study from the University of Colorado suggests that the chemical resveratrol found in grape skins and in red wine can help block the cancer-causing effects of alcohol. Read More
— Around The Home

Somabar robotic bartender cranks out cocktails in under five seconds

There are many people who enjoy sipping on fancy cocktails, but putting together drinks of such sophistication involves a certain expertise, a cabinet's worth of ingredients and a fair slice of your time. Wanting to make this life of luxury a little more accessible, the team behind the Somabar have produced a robotic bartending machine that spits out craft cocktails at the push of a button. Read More
— Around The Home

Sonic Decanter: An (ultra)sound way to improve wine quality

That bargain plonk ordinaire that passes as merely drinkable may soon get featured status at your next party. A startup out of Spokane, Washington, has unveiled its Sonic Decanter designed to improve the flavor, mouthfeel and aroma of wine in 20 minutes or less by using high frequency sound waves to break down preservatives, such as sulfur dioxide, transform the molecular and chemical structure of wine, and accelerate the aging process. Read More
— Outdoors

Hydrapak Stash collapsible water bottle stands up and packs into a pocket disc

In 2013, Hydrapak introduced its SoftFlask series of soft-sided TPU water bottles designed to collapse into your pocket. The design seemed handy, but we wondered why the company chose to use a rather big, bulging bottom on a design meant to pack small. It addresses this shortcoming with the all-new Stash. The Stash's collapsible TPU body is paired with a flat bottom that snaps together with the top, making the packed bottle even easier to transport. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Vessyl is no mug – it’s a smart cup that tells you what you're drinking

At first glance, "Vessyl" looks like an ultra-modern, but relatively ordinary, 13 oz (385 ml) mug. However, pour something into it and it becomes extraordinary: not only will it identify what type of drink it has in it, but Vessyl will also tell you its dietary content, such as sugar, protein, calories, fat, caffeine – even identifying the beverage by name – then take all of those results and synchronize them to your smartphone. Read More
— Science

Lasers could be used to detect drunk drivers

It used to be that the only way you could get a speeding ticket was if a police officer personally witnessed your overly-fast driving. Then photo radar came along. Well, when it comes to drunk driving, lasers could soon be the equivalent of photo radar. Polish researchers at the Military University of Technology in Warsaw have demonstrated how the high-intensity beams of light can be used to detect the presence of alcohol – even exhaled alcohol – in passing vehicles. Read More