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Dreams


— Wearable Electronics

Lucid dreaming made easier with the Aurora EEG headband

Lucid dreaming is believed by many to aid in practicing skills, improving creativity, or just exploring adventurous new worlds, but requires practice and awareness to master. Aurora is an EEG-based headband aiming to enhance dreams and lower the barrier to lucid dreaming. With apps for multiple platforms, a host of features, and an open API for third party applications, iWinks' aim is to help the uninitiated take control of their dreams. Read More
— Science

Volunteers needed to test dream-controlling app

In what is being touted as “the world's largest dream experiment,” a psychologist from Britain’s University of Hertfordshire is inviting volunteers to try using an iPhone app to control their dreams. Prof. Richard Wiseman teamed up with the developers at software company YUZA to create Dream:ON, an app that plays soundscapes while its user sleeps, intended to shape what sort of dreams they have. The project comes in response to a UK survey conducted by Wiseman, in which 15% of respondents claimed that they frequently suffered from unpleasant dreams. Read More
— Good Thinking

Yumemiru app aims to let you control your dreams

We all wish we could control what our dreams are at night, whether it's to pretend we have powers like Superman or simply to enjoy a relaxing stroll through a mansion on the Moon that happens to have a talking lion for a butler, complete with monocle. Sadly, we're still a long way away from programming our sleeping moments like a Netflix queue, but one Japanese app may have a quick solution. The Yumemiru app for iOS can detect when you enter dream sleep and then plays a soundtrack to influence what happens in your dreams. Read More
— Science

Visualizing data from the visual cortex: one step closer to dream recording?

Dream analysis could be set to become a whole lot easier with news that a Japanese research team has created a technology that could eventually display images from people’s dreams on a computer screen. So far the team at the ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories has only managed to reproduce simple images from the brain, but, “by applying this technology, it may become possible to record and replay subjective images that people perceive like dreams," the private institute said in a statement. Read More
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