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Holovision aims at life-size 3D projections

Close on the heels of the 21st century complaint of “Where’s my jetpack?” is “Where’s my holographic projector?”. Nothing spells “future” like having a conversation with someone whose life-size image is beamed into the room. Provision of Chatsworth, California wants to bring that one step closer to reality, with its Holovision life-size holographic projector. The company is currently running a Kickstarter campaign aimed at raising US$950,000 to fund the development of new technology for the projector, with hopes of unveiling it next year.Read More

Motorcycles

Reevu aims to be first to bring a motorcycle helmet HUD to market

Motorcycle helmet innovator Reevu has come up with what it claims is the world's first commercially available intelligent helmet with a built-in heads-up display, or HUD. While that's a bit misleading – it won't actually be available for another 18-24 months – a HUD for bikers is clearly an exciting prospect, and Reevu with its experience in building in rear-vision capabilities is probably in an excellent position to get it to market.Read More

Electronics

LG slims down Full HD smartphone panel

Just over a year after showing off a new Full HD smartphone display, LG's Display wing has taken the wraps off a new variant that's being hailed as the world's thinnest. The working 5.2-inch panel boasts a 1,920 x 1,080 pixel resolution, and represents the first outing for a proprietary touch technology called Advanced One-Glass-Solution, where two flexible printed circuits are positioned between the glass and the touch layer. Read More

Electronics

New technology from MIT may enable cheap, color, holographic video displays

Researchers at MIT’s Media Lab have developed a new form of holographic projector that may enable the introduction of practical color 3D holographic video displays as well as higher-resolution 2D displays with lower power consumption. The new projector is built using principles of guided wave optics to construct the spatial light modulator (SLM) that is the heart of digital holography. The MIT holographic projector, which contains an SLM costing US$10 to fabricate, provides 3D images at 30 frames per second (fps) with a resolution similar to that of a standard-definition TV. Read More

Laptops

Samsung packs more pixels into tablet and notebook displays

Samsung Display has chosen Vancouver's Display Week Exhibition hosted by the Society for Information Display to unveil two new Retina-beating display panels. The WQXGA 10.1-inch LCD screen will be used for tablets, while the QHD+ 13.3-inch is destined for notebooks. Details are scant, but we have managed to persuade Samsung to part with a few key specs.Read More

Laptops

Casetop "laptop" uses your smartphone as its brains

Packing powerful processors supported by a healthy amount of system memory and storage, modern smartphones are just like mini computers that can be carried around in your pocket. As a mobile office, however, such devices do have some practical limitations. Even with the relatively large display offered by Samsung's new Galaxy S4, for example, having to use a finger to input text can be a real productivity killer. What's needed is a comfortable physical keyboard and more spacious display real estate. That's precisely what's on offer with the Casetop from Livi Design, a netbook-like LCD panel, keyboard and battery pack combination that uses a smartphone for its computing power.Read More

Electronics

“Smell-o-Vision” display emits localized virtual odors

Localized dimming is a feature found in many televisions these days, but what about a display capable of producing localized smells? That’s exactly what a team from the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology in Japan has created. The “smelling screen” that was recently presented at the IEEE Virtual Reality 2013 conference in Orlando, Florida can produce odors that appear to emanate from specific areas of the screen.Read More

Military

Raytheon developing 3D hearing for pilots

Pilots need sharp eyes, but Raytheon is looking to their ears as well. The company has developed a new 3D Audio system for aircraft, that turns information into an audible three-dimensional picture. It helps pilots identify where threats are coming from, and keeps radio channels untangled.Read More

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