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— Electronics

First flexible graphene-based display created

Flexible displays are the new must-have element in the race for the next generation of high-tech electronic devices. A new prototype display created with graphene promises to provide a more efficient, printable alternative to current construction methods with the added benefit of perhaps one day creating a true, fully-folding display. Read More
— Electronics

Spheree takes a globular approach to displaying 3D models

Although viewing a 3D digital model of an item allows you get a sense of the "real" object, it certainly doesn’t help if you’re looking at that three-dimensional model on a flat screen. That’s why Spheree was created. The result of a collaboration between a group of Brazilian and Canadian universities, it’s a spherical display that users can walk around, viewing a model from various angles as if the object were physically in front of them. Read More
— Computers

LG curved ultra-wide monitor leads IFA 2014 assault

Gamers, graphic artists, CAD designers and even humble tech journalists who regularly spread their onscreen activities across multiple displays will doubtless have been as impressed as we were with LG's 34-inch UltraWide UM95 monitor on show at CES back in January. Now the Korean consumer electronics giant has gone one better with the announcement of an IFA 2014 debut for its 21:9 aspect curved QHD monitor, the UC97. Read More
— Automotive

Continental's Augmented Reality HUD puts information on the road

Displaying your speed on the windshield can be handy for keeping under the speed limit, but Continental is taking things to the next level with its Augmented Reality Head-up Display (AR-HUD) prototype. In addition to showing your current speed, the system can overlay information on the road specifically where it is most relevant to the driver, such as the distance to the car in front, when to make a turn, or even upcoming driving conditions. Read More
— Computers

Vision-correcting display lets users ditch their reading glasses

In an age where reading something from a screen on a phone or a computer is a normal part of our daily lives, the wearing of glasses or contact lenses often makes doing so a chore with eye-strain problems and the necessity to carry around spectacles or lenses wherever you go. In this vein, researchers at the University of California at Berkeley have created a prototype vision-correcting, printed pinhole matrix that they claim fits directly to a screen and negates the need for eyeglasses or remedial lenses and may one day offer improved visual acuity to those with eye problems much worse than simple farsightedness. Read More
— Electronics

"Nano-pixels" hold huge potential for flexible, low-power, high-res screens

The Retina displays featured on Apple's iPhone 4 and 5 models pack a pixel density of 326 ppi, with individual pixels measuring 78 micrometers. That might seem plenty good enough given the average human eye is unable to differentiate between the individual pixels, but scientists in the UK have now developed technology that could lead to extremely high-resolution displays that put such pixel densities to shame. Read More
— Electronics

LG "rolls out" latest flexible and transparent OLED panels

After unveiling the world's first flexible OLED TV at CES earlier this year, LG has gone a step further with the unveiling of two new 18-inch OLED panels: the first is a transparent display, while the second can be rolled up. Although both fall short of the 77-inch flexible TV on show at CES, the company says the new panels prove that it has the technology to bring rollable TVs with screens in excess of 50 inches to market in the future. Read More
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