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Physics

New process prints electroluminescent layers directly onto three-dimensional objects

Electroluminescent (EL) panels are found in many electronics applications, particularly as backlighting for LCD displays, keypads, watches, and other areas requiring uniform, low-power illumination. While relatively flexible, when EL panels made from plastic are bent too sharply, fractures and a severely diminished output usually result. As a result, EL panels have generally been restricted to flat or slightly curved surfaces. However, researchers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Franz Binder GmbH & Co have now developed a new manufacturing process to print EL panels directly onto the surface of almost any convex and concave shape. Even, apparently, onto spheres.Read More

Electronics

MirrorMirror reflects you and your digital info

Doing your hair and brushing your teeth are chores that may become a little more interesting and fun with a new mirror that, besides reflecting, can also display emails, news threads, tweets, public transport times and all kinds of online data. That's because a student team from the College of Science and College of Engineering at Purdue University has created a mirror that doubles as an information interface. Keeping up-to-date with bus schedules inspired the team to come up with the info-mirror.Read More

Electronics

PrintDisplay: DIY displays and touchscreens anyone can print

For years now, we've been promised miraculous new flexible touchscreen displays, but the deployment of such technology in big consumer products, like say the LG G Flex, hasn't started any revolutions just yet. That could soon change thanks to a team of computer scientists from Germany's Saarland University who have developed a technique that could allow anyone to literally print their own custom touchscreen displays. Read More

Electronics

Flexible graphene-based LED clears the way for flexible displays

Researchers from the University of Manchester and University of Sheffield have developed a new prototype semi-transparent, graphene-based LED device that could form the basis of flexible screens for use in the next-generation of mobile phones, tablets and televisions. The incredibly thin display was created using sandwiched "heterostructures", is only 10-40 atoms thick and emits a sheet of light across its entire surface. Read More

Electronics

Prototype system paves way for huge, glasses-free 3D displays

Using red/blue filters (anaglyph), polarized (passive) or LED shutter (active) glasses are relatively simple ways of creating a 3D effect. Creating 3D pictures without viewers having to don any form of eyewear is a little trickier and is made even more so if you want really big 3D effects for a sports stadium or a billboard. To help address this, Austrian scientists working at the Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) and the company TriLite Technologies have developed a new kind of display just for this purpose that sends beams of light directly to the viewers’ eyes via a laser and a sophisticated mirror system. Read More

Computers

Latest ThinkPads stay thin, add stackable accessories

ThinkPad is a name with some history behind it that shows no signs of slowing down, even after two decades, the sale of the laptop and tablet line to Lenovo from IBM, and Apple's more successful co-opting of the word "pad" as a suffix in the name of its hit tablet. To kick off CES 2015 in Las Vegas this week, Lenovo announced a refresh of its 14-inch ThinkPad ultrabook and the ThinkPad Stack, a collection of stackable accessories to increase the capabilities of a tablet or notebook.Read More
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