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Disney Research


— Science

Disney tech may lead to better dubbing of foreign films

By - April 22, 2015
Here's something you might not know about foreign-language films ... when they're dubbed to English, the editors don't necessarily just go with the most literal translation. Instead, they observe the actors' lip movements, then choose English dialogue that at least somewhat matches up with those. Now, a team from Disney Research Pittsburgh and the University of East Anglia has developed a system that does so automatically, and that offers a wider range of suggested alternate phrases. Read More
— Mobile Technology

"Acoustruments" could add physical controls to smartphones – using nothing but a plastic tube

By - April 21, 2015 5 Pictures
While the touchscreen is perhaps the most versatile input method ever created, it's not ideal for every situation, offering little in the way of tangible physical controls. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research have put their minds to the problem, creating a series of accessories, known as Acoustruments, which take inspiration from wind instruments to make smartphone interaction more physical – without any Bluetooth or wired connections. Read More
— Sports

Disney Research models analyze and predict player behavior in basketball and soccer

By - December 17, 2014 3 Pictures
With all the stats and analysis getting batted around, you could be forgiven for thinking that modern sport is not about the grand battles between opposing players and teams but rather an elaborate exercise in data modelling. An entire industry is forming around predictions and tracking in sports, on the one hand to understand and on the other to compete better. Now Disney Research has released two new studies that help both of these along. One study analyzed soccer player and ball movement patterns to detect and visualize team formations, while the other built models that could accurately predict whether a basketball player will pass or shoot in a given game situation. Read More
— Digital Cameras

Disney Research algorithm automatically edits footage captured by multiple cameras

By - August 11, 2014 2 Pictures
These days, with most people toting camera-packing smartphones, friends and families act as a veritable film crew, ready to capture important moments from a multitude of angles. But editing the footage into a cohesive whole can be a time-consuming chore. Now a team at Disney Research has developed an algorithm that automatically edits hours of raw footage into something less tedious to sit through. Read More
— 3D Printing

Disney algorithm has asymmetrical objects in a spin

By - August 10, 2014 7 Pictures
Tops, yo-yos, and other spinning toys are amongst the oldest playthings created by man, with the earliest examples dating back to 3,500 BC. Paradoxically, they’re not very easy to make with their design requiring a lot of trial and error. One mistake and, instead of a pirouetting plaything, you get a clattering paperweight. That’s why spinning toys tend to be symmetrical – until now. In a blow for symmetry, Disney Research Zurich and ETH Zurich have developed a computer algorithm that can take any shape, no matter how cock-eyed, and make it spin like a top. Read More
— Sports

NFL may track footballs using magnetic fields

By - June 13, 2014 5 Pictures
Have you ever wondered how game officials know if the football has passed the goal line, in situations where it's hidden under a pile-up of players? Well, sometimes they don't know, and they just have to hope that it isn't moved as the players get up. A team of researchers from North Carolina State University, Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research, however, may have a solution. They're developing a method of tracking a football via low-frequency magnetic fields. Read More
— 3D Printing

Disney researchers 3D print speakers in any shape imaginable

By - April 30, 2014 9 Pictures
It's one thing to assemble a loudspeaker from 3D-printed components, but researchers at Disney have figured out a way to 3D print interactive loudspeakers in any shape imaginable, while also integrating speaker functionality into the whole object or just parts of it. Just envision 3D printing an entire loudspeaker in one step in the shape of Cinderella, and having sounds boom off her whole body or just her skirt. Read More
— 3D Printing

"Felting printer" creates soft 3D-printed teddy bears

By - April 28, 2014 2 Pictures
Ask someone to think of a 3D-printed object, and chances are they'll picture something hard ... or perhaps rubbery. Thanks to new technology developed by Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research Pittsburgh, however, it's now possible to make soft and fuzzy 3D-printed items, using yarn instead of plastic or resin. Among the first items to be created were little felt teddy bears. Read More
— Electronics

Paper Generators bring a spark of new life to the printed page

By - October 10, 2013 7 Pictures
Disney Research, Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University have released details of another one of their collaborative projects, this one involving thin, flexible generators that can be built into paper items such as the pages of a book. By simply rubbing or tapping one of these pages, users can illuminate LEDs, prompt applications on linked computers, or even activate e-ink displays – no batteries or outlets required. Read More
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