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Disease

The Kinsa Smart Thermometer in use

When someone is feeling sick, you take their temperature to see if they’re running a fever. That’s the way it’s been for decades. However, all that a regular thermometer will tell you is their body temperature – it won’t tell you what they might have, or what you should do. The Kinsa Smart Thermometer, while not quite a medical tricorder, is designed to do those things.  Read More

Swiss researchers have used mass spectrometry to test a diagnostic method based on breath ...

Traditional Chinese medicine has long analyzed breath as a way to assess human health and in recent times state-of-the-art technology has been brought to this approach to diagnose various diseases and even stress. Swiss researchers at ETH Zurich and at the University Hospital Zurich are continuing to advance this field by developing a “breathprinting” technique using mass spectrometry that they hope will become competitive with the established analysis methods based on blood and urine.  Read More

Cambridge scientists have unveiled new data on the mechanisms of a contagious tumor that t...

While many animals face extinction due to poaching or loss of habitat, Tasmanian devil numbers are sbeing dramatically reduced due to a contagious tumor with a mortality rate of 100 percent. Called Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD), it kills the animal in a matter of months. Now fresh research from the University of Cambridge has delivered new data on the mechanism of the disease which could increase the chances of developing a vaccine.  Read More

The above image of a cancer cell by Jane Stout of Indiana University won the microscopy ca...

We report on the latest developments in biological research all the time here at Gizmag, but it's easy to forget just how beautiful biology can appear when observed at the cellular level. On this note, GE Healthcare’s Life Sciences Cell Imaging Competition has announced its winners for 2012, giving us the opportunity to appreciate the images which will soon light up New York’s Times Square.  Read More

Led by Fàtima Bosch (fifth from left), a University of Barcelona research team has cured d...

Researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have claimed a first by successfully using a single session of gene therapy to cure dogs of type 1 diabetes. The work has shown that it is possible to cure the disease in large animals with a minimally-invasive procedure – potentially leading the way to further developments in studies for human treatment of the disease.  Read More

Scientists have used microneedle arrays to store a live vaccine at room temperature, and a...

While it’s vitally important to bring vaccines for diseases such as tuberculosis to developing nations, getting them there is only part of the challenge. Because these countries often have unreliable infrastructures, it’s entirely possible that the vaccines can’t consistently be kept as cold as is required. As a result, they could be rendered ineffective. Now, however, scientists from King’s College London have succeeded in containing a dried live vaccine in a microneedle array, that doesn’t need to be refrigerated.  Read More

David’s myotis, a tiny insectivorous bat native to China, was one of two bat species selec...

Scientists believe the genes of virus-resistant and long-living wild bats might hold clues to treating cancer and infectious diseases in humans. The theory is that when bats started flying millions of years ago, something changed in their DNA that provides resistance to viruses and helps give them a relatively long life. The researchers hope a better understanding of bat evolution could lead to new treatments for disease and aging in humans.  Read More

A modified form of a protein found in the HIV virus (pictured) has been shown to keep that...

Although there is still much work to do before human trials can even be considered, a scientist from Australia’s Queensland Institute of Medical Research has created a protein that reportedly keeps HIV from progressing into AIDS. Perhaps ironically, that protein is a mutated form of one found in the HIV virus itself.  Read More

Microbiologist Emma Allen-Vercoe and her lab team, whipping up a batch of RePOOPulate

If the clostridium difficile bacterium becomes over-abundant in a person’s colon, the results can include gastrointestinal problems such as severe diarrhea. Ordinarily, c. difficile populations are kept in check by the usually-present beneficial gut bacteria. If those “good” bacteria are killed off as a side effect of taking antibiotics, however, the nasties can take over. The treatment? Well ... it often involves having another person’s stool implanted in your gut via enema. Yikes. Fortunately, a less icky treatment is in the works, that involves the use of a “synthetic poop” known as RePOOPulate.  Read More

A 3D image of a rotavirus, constructed from data gathered using the new technique

Traditionally, in order to view tiny biological structures such as viruses, they must first be removed from their natural habitats and frozen. While this certainly keeps them still for the microscope, it greatly limits what we can learn about them – it’s comparable to an ichthyologist only being able to study dead fish in a lab, instead of observing live ones in the ocean. Now, however, researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have devised a technique for observing live viruses in a liquid environment. It could have huge implications for the development of treatments for viral infections.  Read More

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