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Diamonds

A new form of superhard carbon discovered by scientists could have advantages over diamond...

Carbon is the fourth-most-abundant element in the universe and comes in a wide variety of forms, called allotropes, including graphite, graphene, and the hardest natural material known to man, diamonds. Now scientists have discovered a new form of carbon that is capable of withstanding extreme pressure stresses previously only observed in diamond. Unlike crystalline forms of carbon such as diamonds, whose hardness is highly dependent upon the direction in which the crystal is formed, the new form of carbon is amorphous meaning it could be equally strong in all directions.  Read More

One of the diamond cavities carved by the NIST team

With sizes typically measured in micrometers, Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices are already being used in applications such as super-accurate sensors, energy-harvesting devices, and electronic signal amplifiers. Given how difficult it would be to replace such systems' moving parts as they wear out, it would be ideal if those parts could be made from as hard a material as possible. Well, while most MEMS are presently made chiefly of silicon, researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are now on their way to making them from diamonds.  Read More

Diamond Planets, good headlines, public opinion and the carbon lobby

Matthew Bailes is Pro-Vice Chancellor (Research) of the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia, and was one of the scientists responsible for the discovery of the diamond planet which received widespread news coverage over the last few weeks. In a well-penned article, Bailes discusses the reaction to the discovery and raises some very interesting questions about the way the scientific method is used and abused by the media.  Read More

Dr. Simone Kondruweit, Dr. Lothar Schafer, Dr. Markus Hofer, Markus Armgard of IST where t...

Diamonds aren’t just a girl’s best friend - they also boast outstanding physical properties that makes them an ideal material for industrial applications such as cutting and polishing. It is extraordinarily hard, conducts heat well and is practically inert to chemical substances. Ceramics – particularly high-performance ceramics – are likewise able to demonstrate special qualities. They are robust and withstands high temperatures. Researchers have now created a diamond coated ceramics composite material that combines the best of both materials.  Read More

A diamond-based nanowire device (Illustrated by Jay Penni)

Current computers operate using binary coding; thousands to trillions of small electrical circuits representing a binary digit (bit) of information that represent a "1" when the circuit is switched on and a "0" when switched off by means of an electronic switch. The future of computing is to move this to a quantum scale, where the weird properties of subatomic particles can be used to create much faster computers. A new device developed by Harvard scientists which uses nanostructured diamond wire to provide a bright, stable source of single photons at room temperature represents a breakthrough in making this quantum technology a reality.  Read More

Blancpain's Valentine's 2010 edition watch has a   mother-of-pearl dial and is set with ov...

Swiss luxury watchmaker Blancpain has continued its annual tradition of celebrating the most romantic day of the year with a new design set for release on February 14th 2010. This speciality timepiece combines an sinuously-contoured silhouette created by a glittering border of over 500 precious stones. A heart is set into the dial fashioned in white and pink mother-of-pearl and echoed in pink sapphires and diamonds encircling the dial. A heart-shaped diamond appears at 12 o'clock, while the pin buckle is set with a pear-shaped pink sapphire. The straps are satin, and only 14 of these extraordinary limited edition ensembles will be created - the price is unknown, but rest assured, it will represent a whole lotta love!  Read More

The device developed at the University of Twente consistently transfers magnetic informati...

In a recent issue of the journal Nature, researchers from the University of Twente, Netherlands, explain how they succeeded in transferring magnetically coded information directly into a semiconductor, for the first time at room temperatures. Meanwhile, Toshiba announced at the International Electronics Devices Meeting (IEDM) it has developed a MOSFET transistor harnessing spintronics, demonstrating stable, fast and low-power performance.  Read More

An electromagnetic waveguide placed on diamond crystals can deliver fields strong enough t...

Scientists at UC Santa Barbara have made important advances in the field of spintronics by demonstrating the ability to electrically manipulate, at room temperatures, the quantum states of electrons trapped in the atomic structural defects of diamond crystals. Despite previous indications to the contrary, such quantum states can be manipulated very quickly, even at gigahertz frequencies, paving the way to significantly faster quantum computing.  Read More

When hit by green light, nitrogen impurities in diamonds become fluorescent and emit a bri...

While working on their long-term goal of achieving a true quantum computer, a team of researchers from Stanford University, the Joint Quantum Institute, MIT and Texas A&M University has recently discovered that tiny nitrogen impurities in diamonds make outstanding magnetic probes in the cellular and molecular scale, with important applications that could truly benefit medical research.  Read More

Nero Gold handset in mixed metal

The words “global economic downturn” are not are part of luxury phone maker Bellperre’s vocabulary, as evidenced by the release of its new high-end Nero Gold series. The Netherlands based company offers handcrafted tailor made handsets using “0% plastic”, and has now added even more precious metals and gemstones to the available mix.  Read More

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