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Diagnostic devices


— Medical

Firefly enzyme inspires Swiss team to create portable disease test kit

By - July 28, 2015 1 Picture

Portable test kits represent an advance in disease diagnosis, as their ready availability increases chances of earlier detection and treatment. This type of technology is constantly evolving, and sometimes inspiration can come from surprising sources. Such is the case with research carried out by a Swiss team, which has borrowed from the mechanics behind the firefly's glow to develop a sensitive molecule detector.

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— Medical

Optical device takes after a dog's nose to sniff out disease

By - July 8, 2015 1 Picture

When things in our body go awry, through disease or infection, for example, the types of molecules in our breath can change. These variations have presented researchers around the world with a very real opportunity to detect various conditions, including lung cancer, with unprecedented ease. The latest scientists to start sniffing around this emerging form of medical diagnosis is a team from the University of Adelaide, who are developing a laser instrument inspired by dog's nose that can screen breath samples for signs of unrest.

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— Medical

Turning the smartphone into a mobile pregnancy test

By - July 6, 2015 1 Picture

Today's smartphones come chock-full of technological capability, intended to help us with everything from taking holiday snaps, finding our way around a new town or staying connected with people around the world. As it turns out, the hardware inside is starting to show huge promise in the world of medical diagnostics, with smartphones repurposed as blood-scanning microscopes, HIV testers and sleep apnea detectors. The latest advance in this area comes in the form of a fiber optic sensor for smartphones that monitors bodily fluids, a tool that could be used for biomolecular tests such as pregnancy or diabetes monitoring.

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— Health and Wellbeing

Researchers develop new paper-based portable lab

By - March 11, 2015 2 Pictures
Point-of-care medical diagnostics technologies offer a fast and cheap way to help patients as they require no experienced personnel or expensive laboratory tests. Several innovations such as a DNA test chip and a biosensor that can detect viruses give us an idea of the possibilities in this field. Now a research team at the University of Rhode Island in the US has developed a paper-based platform that's claimed can perform complex diagnostics. Read More
— Medical

Smartphone dongle detects HIV and syphilis markers in 15 minutes

By - February 4, 2015 3 Pictures
That smartphones have evolved to be capable of much more than making and receiving calls won't be news to many, but work being done to refashion them as medical diagnostics tools is proving to be a very promising area of mobile innovation. The latest big-picture idea to emerge in this area is a smartphone dongle capable of detecting three infectious disease markers within 15 minutes, requiring only a finger prick of blood. Read More
— Automotive

Mechanic Advisor's Connection Key tells you what’s wrong with your car, and who can fix it

By - December 23, 2014 4 Pictures
Mechanic Advisors’ new product is designed to make the appearance of the dreaded check engine light that little bit less disheartening, by giving car owners a portal into the health of their vehicle. The device provides drivers with the same information available to their local auto repair shop, but what makes it truly unique is its ability to put them in touch with a suitable, trustworthy mechanic. Read More
— Medical

X Challenge winner diagnoses diseases in minutes from a single drop of blood

By - November 11, 2014 4 Pictures
For the last two years, the US$2.25 million Nokia Sensing X Challenge has lured entrants from around the globe to submit groundbreaking technologies that improve access to health care. A panel of experts have awarded this year's grand prize to Massachusetts-based DNA Medical Institute (DMI), whose hand-held device is capable of diagnosing ailments in minutes, using only a single drop of blood. Read More
— Medical

Handheld device offers high-tech medical testing for developing countries

By - August 16, 2014 1 Picture
A device that transmits the results of many forms of electrochemical analysis directly to a computer anywhere in the world using a standard mobile phone has been developed by Harvard researchers working at Flowers University. Created as an inexpensive detector for use in the world’s most impoverished areas where medical testing equipment is scarce and costly, the handheld device can be used to monitor diabetes, detect malaria, and analyze drinking water for environmental pollutants – all in the one compact unit. Read More
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