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Data Storage

— Computers

Seagate demonstrates HAMR hard drive technology that promises 60 TB HDDs

By - March 19, 2012 1 Picture
Despite solid state drives increasing in capacity in recent years, the humble platter-based 3.5-inch hard drive still reigns supreme as the data storage device to beat in terms of bits for your buck. But if traditional drives are going to meet user’s ever-increasing data storage demands they will need to improve on the maximum 620 gigabits per square inch storage densities currently possible in platter based 3.5-inch drives. That’s just what Seagate has demonstrated with new technology that has achieved a milestone storage density of 1 terabit per square inch. Read More
— Computers

WD releases My Book Thunderbolt Duo in 4 TB and 6 TB capacities

By - March 15, 2012 2 Pictures
Western Digital (WD) has begun shipping its first Thunderbolt equipped storage device in the form of the My Book Thunderbolt Duo. The device is a dual-drive unit available in 4 TB (2 x 2 TB) and 6 TB (2 x 3 TB) capacities and features dual Thunderbolt ports (and only dual Thunderbolt ports – there’s no USB to fall back on here) on the rear for daisy-chaining of up to six My Book Thunderbolt Duo drives or other Thunderbolt peripherals. Read More
— Science

Recording data using heat could lead to faster, more efficient magnetic recording devices

By - February 8, 2012 2 Pictures
For the past several decades, it has been assumed that in order to store data on a magnetic medium, a magnetic field must be applied. Recently, however, an international team of scientists discovered that heat can be used instead of a magnetic field. Not only is this method reportedly more energy efficient, but it also theoretically allows for ten times the storage capacity and 300 times the performance of current hard drive technology. Read More
— Spy Gear

Secret agents can create a Wi-Fi network and hide important files with these cufflinks

By - January 26, 2012 1 Picture
Life as a secret agent means you need to have access to the internet when you need it, as well as have the ability to carry around important files in locations where your adversaries won't think to look. These secret agent-worthy Wi-Fi cufflinks let you wear your mobile hotspot on one wrist, and carry around 2GB of important files on the other. The Wi-Fi cufflink essentially acts like a miniature router. The end pops out, and when plugged into the USB port on your web-connected computer creates a hotspot that can be used by other devices like laptops, smartphones, and tablets. Read More
— Science

World's smallest magnetic data storage unit created

By - January 13, 2012 1 Picture
If you’re impressed with how much data can be stored on your portable hard drive, well ... that’s nothing. Scientists have now created a functioning magnetic data storage unit that measures just 4 by 16 nanometers, uses 12 atoms per bit, and can store an entire byte (8 bits) on as little as 96 atoms – by contrast, a regular hard drive requires half a billion atoms for each byte. It was created by a team of scientists from IBM and the German Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), which is a joint venture of the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY research center in Hamburg, the Max-Planck-Society and the University of Hamburg. Read More
— Science

Salmon DNA used in data storage device

By - January 6, 2012 1 Picture
Salmon ... they’re good to eat, provide a livelihood for fishermen, are an important part of their ecosystem, and now it seems that they can store data. More specifically, their DNA can. Scientists from National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany have created a “write-once-read-many-times” (WORM) memory device, that combines electrodes, silver nanoparticles, and salmon DNA. While the current device is simply a proof-of-concept model, the researchers have stated that DNA could turn out to be a less expensive alternative to traditional inorganic materials such as silicon. Read More
— Computers

Deonet announces world's smallest USB memory stick

By - December 21, 2011 1 Picture
Just when you think that USB Flash storage can't possibly get any smaller, a company pops up with something so tiny that you're going to need the corded fob to make sure you don't lose it. Dutch promotional product manufacturer Deonet - maker of a diamond-studded Golden USB memory stick and an FSC-certified, maple-enclosed Eco Wood drive - has announced just such a portable storage solution, and is the latest to claim the title of the world's smallest USB stick. Read More
— Computers

Hitachi GST outs two new 4TB HDD storage solutions

By - December 13, 2011 1 Picture
Just when you thought that you still had loads of room on the 1TB of storage in your PC or Mac, another holiday season comes around and tempts you to capture all the antics at the office party in multi-megapixel clarity, or record high definition movies of loved ones as they excitedly rip through reams and reams of wrapping paper. Suddenly your monster hard drive starts to look somewhat elf-like. Hitachi GST (Global Storage Technologies) has unveiled two new hard disk storage solutions of gargantuan capacity that may well help to alleviate some of those storage woes. Both center around the same 4TB Deskstar 5K4000 HDD - with one being prepped for internal use, and the other given a nice outer jacket and USB 3.0 connectivity. Read More
— Electronics

Crypteks physically lockable USB flash drive takes data protection seriously

By - December 1, 2011 11 Pictures
Crypteks is bringing out our inner Robert Langdon with the new physically lockable USB flash drive. Featuring a sleek all-metal solid-aluminum alloy construction, the Crypteks USB storage is physically locked inside its housing encrypted with a user-created password that is input by twisting five rings displaying all 26 letters of the alphabet. And if that's still not secure enough, it also offers 256-bit AES Hardware Encryption. Read More
— Environment

Icelandic facility uses geothermal energy to store data for UK colleges

By - December 1, 2011 7 Pictures
Hertford Regional College (HRC) in the UK has joined forces with the Thor Data Center (THORDC) in Iceland to provide cost efficient, eco-friendly technology to schools, colleges and universities throughout the UK. The joint venture has been coined "HRC Cube" and is an innovative solution to dealing with increasing cuts in UK government funding to education. Drawing on Iceland's combination of freezing temperatures and natural volcanic heat, THORDC has become one of the most energy-efficient data centers in the world. Powered by clean renewable hydroelectric and geothermal energy sources, the facility is claimed to offer cost savings to its customers whilst at the same time helping them lower their carbon emissions. The fact that it is situated in such a remote location also ensures a high level of security for the data. Read More
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