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Data Storage

Science

Nanofocusing device shrinks light beams

Engineers at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) and the University of California at Berkeley have developed a nanofocusing waveguide, a tiny passive plasmonic device which is capable of concentrating light onto a spot a few nanometers in size. In so doing, they have sidestepped the diffraction-limited nature of light, which normally prevents focusing light to a spot smaller than its own wavelength. This remarkable feat may lead to new optoelectronic applications in computing, communications, and imaging. Read More

Science

New tech could boost HDD capacity fivefold

A team of researchers at the University of Texas is working on a novel design that could circumvent some of the pressing limitations of current data storage technology and open the door to a new generation of very high-density, cheap and reliable hard disk drives.Read More

Computers

A-Drive 5 mm-thick hybrid hard drive for ultrabooks and tablets

Hybrid hard disk drives, such as Seagate’s Momentus XT, offer the performance advantages of a solid state drive (SSD) combined with the capacity and cost advantages of platter-based hard disks. Now the Data Storage Institute (DSI) from Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) has unveiled its own hybrid hard drive called the “A-Drive” that comes in a 2.5-inch form factor and measures a svelte 5 mm thick.Read More

ADATA shows off worlds thinnest USB 3.0 external drive

In the technology world, everyone wants to have the thinnest, fastest, smallest device going around to gain some bragging rights, if only for a short time. ADATA only let Toshiba hold the title of the world's thinnest external HDD for a few days before it rolled out its DashDrive Elite HE720. Coming in at 8.9 mm thick, ADATA managed to shave a fraction of a millimeter off Toshiba's 9 mm thick Canvio Slim portable drive and take the title ... for now, anyway. Read More

Science

Hitachi develops "incorruptible" glass-based data storage technique

Back when compact discs were first coming out, they were touted as being able to store data “forever.” As it turns out, given no more than a decade or so, they can and do degrade. According to an AFP report, Hitachi has unveiled a system that really may allow data to last forever – or at least, for several hundred million years. It involves forming microscopic dots within a piece of quartz glass, those dots serving as binary code.Read More

Computers

Helium-filled hard drives promise capacity boost

Unlike Iomega’s eGo Helium portable hard drive, a new hard disk drive platform developed by Western Digital (WD) subsidiary HGST actually does fill hard drives with helium. Rather than just making the drive a little bit lighter, replacing regular old air with helium and sealing it within the drive enclosure has allowed HGST to increase hard drive storage capacity by 40 percent while reducing power consumption by 23 percent. Read More

Science

Harvard geneticist stores 70 billion copies of his book in DNA

George Church is a professor of genetics at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and also co-author of the book Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves in DNA. With a title like that, it’s only fitting that the book was used to break the record that it recently did – Church led a team that encoded 70 billion html copies of the book in DNA. That’s 1,000 times more data than the previous record.Read More

Hybrid Series iPhone case features removable USB drive

A lot of people like the idea of being able to carry things like photo or video files with them on their iPhone, but depending on what capacity model they have, may not necessarily want to take up memory on the phone with those files. That’s where ego & company’s Hybrid Series USB Case comes into play – it’s a case for the iPhone 4 and 4S, with a built-in USB Flash drive.Read More

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