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Data Storage

— Science

Hitachi develops "incorruptible" glass-based data storage technique

Back when compact discs were first coming out, they were touted as being able to store data “forever.” As it turns out, given no more than a decade or so, they can and do degrade. According to an AFP report, Hitachi has unveiled a system that really may allow data to last forever – or at least, for several hundred million years. It involves forming microscopic dots within a piece of quartz glass, those dots serving as binary code. Read More

ADATA shows off worlds thinnest USB 3.0 external drive

In the technology world, everyone wants to have the thinnest, fastest, smallest device going around to gain some bragging rights, if only for a short time. ADATA only let Toshiba hold the title of the world's thinnest external HDD for a few days before it rolled out its DashDrive Elite HE720. Coming in at 8.9 mm thick, ADATA managed to shave a fraction of a millimeter off Toshiba's 9 mm thick Canvio Slim portable drive and take the title ... for now, anyway. Read More
— Computers

Helium-filled hard drives promise capacity boost

Unlike Iomega’s eGo Helium portable hard drive, a new hard disk drive platform developed by Western Digital (WD) subsidiary HGST actually does fill hard drives with helium. Rather than just making the drive a little bit lighter, replacing regular old air with helium and sealing it within the drive enclosure has allowed HGST to increase hard drive storage capacity by 40 percent while reducing power consumption by 23 percent. Read More
— Science

Harvard geneticist stores 70 billion copies of his book in DNA

George Church is a professor of genetics at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and also co-author of the book Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves in DNA. With a title like that, it’s only fitting that the book was used to break the record that it recently did – Church led a team that encoded 70 billion html copies of the book in DNA. That’s 1,000 times more data than the previous record. Read More

Hybrid Series iPhone case features removable USB drive

A lot of people like the idea of being able to carry things like photo or video files with them on their iPhone, but depending on what capacity model they have, may not necessarily want to take up memory on the phone with those files. That’s where ego & company’s Hybrid Series USB Case comes into play – it’s a case for the iPhone 4 and 4S, with a built-in USB Flash drive. Read More
— Computers

Seagate unleashes Backup Plus drives to save media from social networks locally

Backing up data is a simple and yet forgettable part of modern life. If files are important, they need to be stored in multiple places. A desktop or laptop hard drive is the first, and an external drive, disc or the cloud is generally the second. But even if you're diligent - and more than three quarters of us aren't according to data collected by Parks Associates - pictures, videos and other files uploaded to social networking sites might miss that crucial backup. Backup Plus, a new line of storage devices from Seagate, offers to save those photos and videos you posted on Facebook, Flickr and elsewhere with the click of an icon. Read More
— Science

New "ReRAM" memory chip outdoes flash memory in speed, density and energy efficiency

These days, Flash memory is almost the defacto standard for data storage in consumer devices, being found in everything from PCs and digital cameras, to smartphones and USB thumb drives. But a team of researchers at University College of London (UCL) has developed a new type of memory chip that is much faster than Flash memory, while also offering greater storage densities and requiring much less power. Could the days of Flash memory's dominance be numbered? Read More
— Electronics

Transparent, flexible memory chips could replace flash

According to Dr. James M. Tour, a synthetic organic chemist at Houston’s Rice University, flash memory devices can only be built smaller for another six to seven years – at that point, they will reach a technological barrier. Already, however, Tour and his colleagues have developed a new type of memory chip, which they believe could replace flash in thumb drives, smartphones and computers. Not only does their chip allow more data to be stored in a given space, but it can also be folded like paper, withstand temperatures of up to 1,000ºF (538ºC), and is transparent – this means that devices’ screens could also serve as their memory. Read More
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