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Data Storage

— Science

IBM creates world's smallest movie using individual atoms

By - May 1, 2013 15 Pictures
Anyone who’s tried their hand at stop animation will know it’s an incredibly time consuming and delicate job. But spare a thought for scientists at IBM Almaden in California who have produced the world’s smallest stop animation movie by using a scanning tunneling microscope to move individual atoms. Rather than competing with Aardman or Pixar for a slice of the international box office, the film is intended to make the public aware of new technology that could increase computer memories far beyond what is possible today. Read More
— Electronics

Seagate adds two wireless devices to its storage line

By - January 11, 2013 11 Pictures
Seagate Technology has unveiled two new data storage devices at CES in Las Vegas. One, the Seagate Wireless Plus, is a wireless one-terabyte hard drive with Wi-Fi capability and the other, the Seagate Central, is a centralized data storage system for all the computers and other digital devices in the home. The purpose of the two devices is to provide new storage capabilities for home networks and handheld devices. Read More
— Computers

Transporter backs up your files off-site, on other peoples' hard drives

By - January 8, 2013 5 Pictures
When it comes to backing up your files, there are generally two approaches ... you can put them on a physical device such as a hard drive, or you can upload them to the cloud. Hard drives can be lost or destroyed, however, while cloud-based services usually charge monthly fees for larger amounts of data – plus, not everyone feels comfortable trusting their files to faceless corporations. Well, that’s where the Transporter comes in. It allows you to store your files off-site, on the hard drives of people whom you know and trust. Read More
— Science

Nanofocusing device shrinks light beams

By - December 19, 2012 2 Pictures
Engineers at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) and the University of California at Berkeley have developed a nanofocusing waveguide, a tiny passive plasmonic device which is capable of concentrating light onto a spot a few nanometers in size. In so doing, they have sidestepped the diffraction-limited nature of light, which normally prevents focusing light to a spot smaller than its own wavelength. This remarkable feat may lead to new optoelectronic applications in computing, communications, and imaging. Read More
— Computers

A-Drive 5 mm-thick hybrid hard drive for ultrabooks and tablets

By - November 4, 2012 2 Pictures
Hybrid hard disk drives, such as Seagate’s Momentus XT, offer the performance advantages of a solid state drive (SSD) combined with the capacity and cost advantages of platter-based hard disks. Now the Data Storage Institute (DSI) from Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) has unveiled its own hybrid hard drive called the “A-Drive” that comes in a 2.5-inch form factor and measures a svelte 5 mm thick. Read More

ADATA shows off worlds thinnest USB 3.0 external drive

In the technology world, everyone wants to have the thinnest, fastest, smallest device going around to gain some bragging rights, if only for a short time. ADATA only let Toshiba hold the title of the world's thinnest external HDD for a few days before it rolled out its DashDrive Elite HE720. Coming in at 8.9 mm thick, ADATA managed to shave a fraction of a millimeter off Toshiba's 9 mm thick Canvio Slim portable drive and take the title ... for now, anyway. Read More
— Science

Hitachi develops "incorruptible" glass-based data storage technique

By - September 26, 2012 1 Picture
Back when compact discs were first coming out, they were touted as being able to store data “forever.” As it turns out, given no more than a decade or so, they can and do degrade. According to an AFP report, Hitachi has unveiled a system that really may allow data to last forever – or at least, for several hundred million years. It involves forming microscopic dots within a piece of quartz glass, those dots serving as binary code. Read More
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