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Data Storage

— Computers

SecureDrives destroy data with a text message

A misplaced storage device could lead to the leaking of a few embarrassing photos for some, while for those dealing in confidential information there might be a whole lot more at stake. Enter these self-destructing hard drives from London-based data security specialists SecureDrives, which appear ordinary storage devices on the surface but are capable of destroying onboard data when triggered by a simple SMS message. Read More

Seagate starts shipping world's first 8 TB hard drives

For many, solid-state drives are the way to go because of the speed advantages they offer over traditional platter-based hard drives. However, HDDs still hold the advantage when it comes to cost per GB. It's with that in mind that Seagate has started shipping the world's first 3.5-in HDD with a whopping capacity of 8 TB. Read More
— Computers

Sony's new magnetic tape technology enables 185 TB cartridges

One of the joys of old science fiction movies is watching the giant reel-to-reel tape drives spin around as they serve computers less powerful than a modern wristwatch. But magnetic tape isn't just something found in old UFO episodes; it’s a key component in modern digital systems required to keep modern online systems reliable. At the INTERMAG Europe 2014 international magnetics conference in Dresden, Sony announced a new breakthrough in magnetic tape technology that keeps the medium relevant by allowing a tape cartridge to carry 74 times the data of a conventional data tape, or the equivalent of 3,700 Blu-ray discs. Read More
— Computers

New MRAM technology promises memorable consumer electronics experience

Back in 2005, Professor of Physics Johan Åkerman touted magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) as a promising candidate for a "universal memory" that could replace the various types of memory commonly found alongside each other in modern electronic devices. A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) has now developed a new type of MRAM that could see Åkerman's vision become a reality. Read More
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