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The Varibike in action

Earlier this year, we heard about a proposed arm- and leg-powered bicycle known as the 4StrikeBike. At the time, we knew that if it were to reach production, it would be facing some competition from the existing Raxibo Hand-Tret-Velo. Now, it turns out that another arm-and-legger has also recently hit the market – it’s time to meet the Varibike.  Read More

The HelmMate – it's like a helmet-storing umbrella for your saddle

A new product known as the HelmMate is designed to take care of a couple of common bicycle commuters’ complaints – even if they’re relatively small ones. It lets cyclists stow their helmet on their parked bike instead of having to carry it around, plus it keeps the saddle from getting rained on.  Read More

The Companion Bike Seat adds a second seat to an existing bicycle

Doubling another person on your bike isn’t always the easiest (or safest, or most legal) thing to do, particularly if you have them perching on the handlebars, or sitting on the saddle while you stand up and pedal. Things are somewhat easier if they sit on your rear rack, but that’s not what it’s designed for. The Companion Bike Seat, however, is designed for just that purpose.  Read More

The Repair Rebel features 24 built-in tools

Last month, we heard about a quirky little multi-tool known as the Ringtool. True to its name, it’s ring-shaped, and features nine tool bits built into its outside edge (it also has a bottle opener in the middle). While it’s proven fairly popular in its Kickstarter campaign, some people just might not be satisfied with 10 tools. If you’re one of those people, you might prefer the circular 24-tool Repair Rebel.  Read More

The Rubbee's polyurethane roller engages the rear tire, making a motor-only speed of 25 km...

There are likely quite a few people who think that an electric bicycle might come in handy sometimes, but who aren’t willing to buy a whole other bike or permanently convert their existing non-electric model. Well, that’s why the Rubbee was created. It’s an electric drive unit that attaches to a regular bicycle in only a few seconds, and that comes off just as quickly.  Read More

Graeme Obree's redesigned Beastie (Photo: Rick Robson)

Graeme Obree has redesigned his Beastie prone bicycle ahead of an attempt to break the human-powered land speed record and, potentially, the 100 mph (161 km/h) barrier at the same time. The radical changes made to the now complete bicycle have improved both visibility and aerodynamics. It was tested at Prestwick airport at the end of June.  Read More

The Peleton bike in use

If people can just exercise at home on stationary bikes, why does anyone even bother going to spin classes? Well, for two main reasons: they get guided through the workout by a fitness expert, and (perhaps more importantly) they receive motivation by being part of a group that’s sharing the same experience at the same time. Now, a New York-based team is developing a product that combines the best of both worlds. The Peleton Bike lets users ride in their own homes, while taking part in a spin class that’s being streamed live to a built-in Android tablet.  Read More

For the second time, Factor Bikes claims to have developed the world's most technologicall...

This week Factor Bikes unveiled what could be a new gold standard for technophile road cycling fanatics obsessed with self-quantifying and monitoring. The company claims that its Vis Vires is the "world's most technologically advanced road bike," loaded with wireless sensors, an onboard computer and power crank.  Read More

The Vortex jersey's air channels create a cooling effect

Cyclists who don't dig the idea of fitting a spray bottle next to the brake levers, gear shifters, shock adjusters and other handlebar hardware on their bikes may have a simpler alternative for keeping cool. The new Vortex bicycle jersey includes an integrated airflow system that serves as a sort of air conditioning on the road or trail.  Read More

The Velodroom bicycle tail light automatically turns on and off, adjusts its brightness, a...

While it’s important for cyclists to run a set of lights when they’re riding after dark, using lights in the daytime also helps make them more visible to drivers. That said, the chances are pretty high that daytime cyclists could forget and leave their lights on when they finish their ride ... plus, they’d go through batteries a lot quicker. Estonian inventor Indrek Rebane has already got those things covered, with his Velodroom “smart” tail light.  Read More

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