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The Transport bike, with a storage 'trunk' located in the hubless front wheel

While more and more city dwellers are taking to the streets on bicycles these days, many of them still run into the same problem of how to carry things while riding. Most people will wear a backpack or attach saddle bags to their ride, but would it be easier if a bicycle had a built-in trunk instead? That's what three industrial design students wanted to find out when they made the Transport, a hubless bicycle that replaces the spokes in the front wheel with a handy storage compartment.  Read More

The barely-there Infinity Seat

Of all the complaints that cyclists have about cycling, butt pain/numbness has got to be the biggest. While it's become very common to see bike saddles with a cut-out section in the middle, that's more for relieving pressure specifically on the crotch area (you know what I'm talking about). California chiropractor and triathlete Vincent Marcel, however, has extended that cut-out to include almost the entire inside of the saddle. The result, his Infinity Seat, is said to be very easy on the bum indeed.  Read More

The BitLock is a smartphone-activated bike lock

Consumers now have their choice of several smartphone-controlled door locks, which allow users to grant access to select people, and that automatically cause the door to unlock when a user approaches. San Francisco-based startup Mesh Motion has taken those same ideas, and applied them to a bicycle security device known as the BitLock.  Read More

SeeSense lights can reportedly determine the traffic conditions in which their user is cyc...

Although they may not be in common use just yet, there are already bike lights that automatically turn themselves on or off depending on ambient light levels. The SeeSense light, however, takes things a bit further. Not only does it respond to changes in lighting, but its makers claim that it can also determine the traffic situation in which the cyclist is riding, and adjust its output accordingly.  Read More

The Hammerhead is a bicycle navigation device that uses LEDs to indicate where riders shou...

It's becoming more and more common for cyclists to find their way around using navigation apps on bike-mounted smartphones ... but it's not a perfect setup. For one thing, those phones get shaken around a lot. Additionally, it's risky for cyclists to keep glancing down at the screen, plus keeping that screen constantly awake uses up a lot of battery life. The Hammerhead offers an alternative. It's a water- and shock-proof bar-mounted device that relays simple navigational cues via easy-to-see LEDs.  Read More

The Bike+ is scheduled to hit the market next year

Determined to mimic the efficiency-boosting approach of non-plug-in hybrid cars like the Toyota Prius, Italian manufacturer ZeHus has developed a small, lightweight e-bike system that optimizes cyclists' efficiency. The hub-based unit aims to add exactly the right amount of electric propulsion to create flowing, seamless rides without the huffing, puffing and walking.  Read More

Gizmag tries out the BoomBottle

A lot of people like listening to music while cycling, but don't want to unsafely shut themselves off from traffic noise by wearing headphones. There are already a few devices that address the issue, but Scosche recently introduced its own unique alternative – it's called the BoomBottle, and it's a rugged Bluetooth stereo speaker designed to be carried in a bike's water bottle cage. After meeting some company reps at Interbike 2013, I got the chance to try out one of the funny little gadgets for myself.  Read More

The Defender, in place on the handlebars and ready to go

Last year, a couple of MIT grads took to Kickstarter to raise production funds for their just-about-everything-proof bicycle light, the Defender. Made mainly from a solid block of aluminum, the light was reportedly tough as nails, waterproof, and very theft-resistant. It was also designed to look like the cylinder of a revolver. Well, the Kickstarter project was a success, and the light is now available for purchase. I got my hands on one, to see if it actually lives up to its makers' claims.  Read More

The busy trade show floor at Interbike 2013

If you've visited Gizmag at all within the past several days, then you're likely aware that we attended the Interbike trade show in Las Vegas last week. While we've already posted a number of articles on products that we saw there, we came across many more interesting items that we still haven't told you about. We've compiled a gallery of those various doo-dads here, for your gawking pleasure.  Read More

Slidepad uses the rear brake to activate the front brake

Despite the fact that the majority of a bicycle's stopping power comes from the front brake, many novice and casual riders worry that if they apply that brake too hard, they'll go flying over the handlebars. As a result, to be on the safe side, they often only use the rear brake. It was for cyclists such as these that the Slidepad system was created. It allows both brakes to be applied with the squeeze of a single lever, in such a way that the front brake will never lock up on its own.  Read More

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