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Cycling


— Bicycles

Centinel Wheel makes bikes into e-bikes

By - May 20, 2015 2 Pictures

If you'd like the ease of an electric bicycle but don't want to give up your perfectly good "manual" bike, there is something you can do – you can replace your bike's existing rear wheel with the electrically-powered Copenhagen Wheel or FlyKly, or replace its front wheel with the Omni Wheel. Those three products may soon have to make room for another competitor, however, as the Centinel Wheel enters the marketplace.

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HueRay combines handlebar grips and side lights

There are already bicycle "running lights" that plug into the ends of the handlebars, providing side visibility when cycling at night. HueRay takes that same idea but makes it sturdier and more self-contained, with silicone bar grips that incorporate their own high-intensity LEDs.

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— Bicycles

BrakePack seeks to remedy the motorist/cyclist communication breakdown

By - May 20, 2015 5 Pictures

The relationship between cyclists and motorists can be a tense, frankly unpleasant aspect of the morning commute, but a new invention by Seattle-based company Artefact (or more specifically its incubation program, Startefact) is aiming to patch things up and hopefully save some lives in the process. BrakePack is an LED-fitted smart backpack designed to make cyclists more visible to motorists, while signalling their intentions.

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Bike Balls bring bicycle nuts to all you bicycle nuts

If there are a lot of good ol' boys where you live, then you're likely familiar with Truck Nuts – rubber testicles that are hung from a pickup truck's trailer hitch. Well, a couple of Toronto-based designers have come up with something similar for bicycles. Known as Bike Balls, they actually serve as a tail light that catches motorists' attention by swinging merrily back and forth.

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— Bicycles Review

Review: Aviator and Afterburner "theft-proof" bike lights

By - May 11, 2015 9 Pictures

Bicycle commuters who regularly ride at night would no doubt appreciate having lights that could be left on their bike all the time, with little chance of them getting stolen. That's why Fortified Bicycle Alliance first introduced its Defender headlight, which can only be removed using a specialized tool. Putting out just 50 lumens, though, it's certainly more of a "be seen" than a "see the road" light. That's why Fortified more recently introduced its considerably brighter Aviator headlight and Afterburner tail light. We gave them a try, to see how they stand up to real-world use.

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— Bicycles

Trivek leaning trike lets riders sit back and sit tall

By - May 6, 2015 6 Pictures

Pain in areas such as the neck, butt and knees cause many cyclists to switch to recumbents. A lot of other people shy away from the low-slung bikes and trikes, however, as they have concerns about visibility. That's why Australian manufacturer Hiele has created the Trivek. It's a semi-recumbent delta tricycle that lets its rider sit back in a comfy seat while still sitting tall enough to be seen by motorists.

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— Bicycles

Boxer Cycles gives the trike the look of a classic aircraft

By - May 5, 2015 21 Pictures

Cargo cycles tend to look much more visually interesting than traditional bikes and trikes – designs like the Velove Armadillo are all but guaranteed to turn heads on the street. Even within a segment of such new and unusual designs, the Boxer Rocket stands out with bold, stylish looks. Inspired by both fictional and real-life aircraft from decades way past, the new bicycle carries passengers in an aluminum-skinned "rocket."

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— Bicycles

The Limits cycling power meter may be the simplest, cheapest one yet

By - May 1, 2015 2 Pictures
Competitive cyclists like to track their power output, and many use a power meter in order to do so. Those meters mostly take the form of a device that's either added to or built into one crank arm, and they can cost anywhere from around US$1,000 to over $2,000. The Limits power meter, however, simply goes between the pedal and crank of any bike, and is planned to cost less than $400. Read More
— Automotive

The Velove Armadillo hauls cargo like a human-powered tractor trailer

By - April 30, 2015 13 Pictures
Of all the electric cargo cycles we've seen, including the Urban Arrow and 2X4, the Velove Armadillo promises the most pedal-assist cargo hauling capability. The four-wheeled platform supports a big, ol' cargo box or semi-trailer on the rear, making the typical two-wheel grocery getter look downright undersized. The pedaled quad is so cargo hungry, Velove believes it can replace the cargo van when transporting smaller loads over short distances. Read More
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