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Cube

— Music

Wooden cube converts touch into music

By - February 17, 2014 5 Pictures
The aim of the Hackable Instruments project is to create instruments that can be easily tweaked by the player to find interesting new directions for producing flavorsome tones, without any specialist knowledge of electronics or engineering, while also aiding in the development of distinctive playing styles. Project members Andrew McPherson and Victor Zappi have designed and built a deliberately simple instrument that produces sounds when a player's fingers touch, slide or tap a capacitive sensing strip on one of the wooden cube's faces. Read More
— Around The Home

ModCubes: The LEGO bricks of modular furniture

By - January 15, 2014 7 Pictures
Modular furniture – that is, furniture than can be adapted to suit changing needs – is becoming an increasingly common concept. One company has gone right back to basics, and designed building blocks for an extensive range of modular furniture. These building blocks are called ModCubes, and when combined together they form pieces of furniture known as ModRoomz. The word LEGO is nowhere to be seen, but the Danish toy company deserves at least a small nod of appreciation. Read More
— Games

Futuro Cube lights up tap and turn game challenge fun

By - April 4, 2013 9 Pictures
Before the arrival of those portable computers we like to call smartphones, screen-based games were a relatively simple, though extremely addictive, affair. The Czech Republic's Princip Interactive has taken the essence of classic low-res cellphone games like Tetris or Snake, added a good splash of color and sound, thrown in some challenging physical twists and turns, and created the Futuro Cube. Read More
— Games

Sifteo Cubes take interactive gameplay to a new level

By - March 23, 2011 4 Pictures
Earlier this month we featured some novel building blocks that help teach robotics to kids, and grew from a project at Carnegie Mellon University. Now it's MIT's turn, with the Sifteo Cubes – 1.5-inch gaming blocks sporting full color screens that respond to motion, and interact with the player and each other as they are moved around. Games and apps can be bought online and wirelessly transferred onto the cubes via an internet-connected computer or laptop. The current title catalog includes adult games, puzzles for kids, and challenges and games that people can play together. Read More
— Good Thinking

Have your drink on the rocks - literally

By - December 9, 2009 1 Picture
If you order your drinks “on the rocks” and are in the habit of chewing on the ice cubes you might want to double check that the bartender hasn’t taken you literally and chilled your drink with “Sippin’ Rocks” – unless you fancy a visit to the dentist. Sippin' Rocks are highly-polished cubes of granite that are designed to chill your drink without diluting it. Read More
— Music

Mintpass Cube concept brings analog back to digital music

By - December 9, 2009 4 Pictures
For the last 18 months or so, the collection of design concepts featured on the website of Korean portable media player maker Mintpass has been steadily growing in number. The company says it will continue to push the idea envelope until a "concept is developed into a hot product that sweeps the market." With its retro styling, analog displays and tactile control interface - will the Mintcube concept be the next big thing? Read More
— Computers

Is this the world's most expensive (and annoying) 16GB Flash drive?

By - July 21, 2009 3 Pictures
If there’s one thing you could expect to rely on when it comes to Flash memory it’s that as capacities increase over time, prices decrease. It’s a rule that has been borne out over the years and its continuation has been a source of comfort that everything is right with the world. Now Japan’s Solid Alliance has thrown our world askew with the release of the Mnemosyne, a 16GB flash drive that is yours for the paltry sum of one million yen (approx. USD$10,000.) Read More
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