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CSIRO

— Medical

Primordial goo coating to aid in medical procedures

Prebiotic compounds that promote the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, can be traced back billions of years to their origins in the primordial goo – a rich soup of compounds from which all organic life on Earth is theorized to have begun. Now, scientists at Australia's CSIRO have discovered just how good a rich broth of these early molecules may be at improving the acceptance of implanted medical devices in the human body.

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— Good Thinking

Glowing fingerprints to highlight criminals

Fingerprinting powders are still the go-to tool for investigators, both real and fictional. However, instead of oils, some fingerprints only leave a residue of amino acids and other compounds that fingerprinting powder doesn't adhere to very well. A new technique developed at Australia's CSIRO not only reveals fingerprints in cases where dusting won't, but makes them glow under UV light.

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— 3D Printing Review

CSIRO's Lab 22: Kickstarting a 3D printing revolution in titanium

Australia is wasting billions of dollars of potential value by shipping its world-beating titanium reserves out of the country as raw ore. That's why CSIRO's Lab 22 is making millions of dollars' worth of 3D printing facilities available to Australian businesses in an effort to kick-start a local additive manufacturing revolution that could add billions of dollars' worth of value to the country's raw titanium exports.

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— Medical

Breath test for malaria is in the air

At present, diagnosing malaria can be a difficult process involving powerful microscopes and careful scanning of blood samples for tiny parasites in a technique discovered in 1880. But a more accessible method may be in the works. A team of Australian scientists has discovered that certain chemicals are present and can be detected in the breath of sufferers, raising the possibility of a cheap breath test to diagnose the deadly disease. Read More
— 3D Printing

Researchers create world's first 3D-printed jet engines

Working with colleagues from Deakin University and CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation), researchers from Australia's Monash University have created the world's first 3D-printed jet engine. While they were at it, they created the world's second one, too. One of them is currently on display at the International Air Show in Avalon, Australia, while the other can be seen at the headquarters of French aerospace company Microturbo, in Toulouse. Read More
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