Photokina 2014 highlights

Cryptography

The new device incorporates quantum photon polarization to generate random numbers and cre...

With a new device set to make unbreakable, quantum-based cryptographic security available for everyone for the very first time, ordinary people will be able to use cryptographic systems that – until recently – only existed as experiments in the most advanced physics laboratories. Developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) the device incorporates the quantum mechanics of random photon polarization to generate random numbers and create cryptographic keys.  Read More

Bitcoin replaces trust with cryptography to provide a monetary system without surprises

Bitcoin, the digital cryptocurrency designed to enable anonymous peer-to-peer financial exchanges without the involvement of third parties, is having serious teething problems. However, most such problems are associated with bitcoin storage or conversion, and should settle down as the currency is more widely accepted. Assuming this happens, let's look at the strengths and weaknesses of a mature Bitcoin currency in a modern economy.  Read More

Can you read the time? (Photo: TokyoFlash)

TokyoFlash is a supplier of limited-edition LCD and LED watches that have joyfully substituted the conventional clock hands and dull numerals for exotic displays featuring counter-intuitive ideograms, that transform telling the time into an exercise in decryption. Its new Kisai Spider Acetate watch has arguably set a new standard for inscrutability.  Read More

Useful Chrome extensions for useful people

It's the world's most used web browser, but how many users are using extensions to get the most out of Google Chrome? (Probably very many. That's just the sort of annoying question journalists like to ask by way of an introduction.) Here are some of my favorites, not geared towards any particular profession, which I think could prove useful to my fellow generalist web users out there in the world. There are no gimmicks; no bossy extensions telling you what or what not to do; merely usefulness, hopefully.  Read More

Undetectable hardware Trojans could subvert cryptographic security (Image: Shutterstock)

Researchers have shown that it is possible to compromise the functioning of a cryptographic chip without changing its physical layout. Based on altering the distribution of dopants in a few components on the chip during fabrication, this method represents a big challenge for cyber-security as it is nearly impossible to detect with any currently practical detection scheme.  Read More

Looking for something? Search our 28,553 articles