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Only one other cricket ball has been pounded as mercilessly in a first class match - the M...

West Indian Sir Garfield Sobers is widely regarded as one of the best cricketers of all time. His career sadly came to an end before the shorter forms of the sport (Twenty20 and one-day) arrived, because Sobers could conjure up a storm with a bat like few others. Even with the recent advent of 50 over and now 20 over a side cricket, the feat of hitting every ball of a six ball over for six has only been done four times, two of those in the shortened form of the game more conducive to fast scoring. Sobers was the first to achieve it in the longer form of the game (a feat only equaled once) and the ball he hit over the fence six consecutive times in 1968 is to go to auction.  Read More

How much is this bat worth?

If it is indeed possible for a piece of sporting equipment to contain magic, then a very special cricket bat coming up for auction on June 1 must surely be infused with a healthy dose. It is the bat which Sir Ian Botham used in one of cricket's truly legendary performances, thirty years ago next month – the fabled Headingly test of 1981. How much is it estimated to go for? Have a guess - you won't believe the answer.  Read More

The new Mongoose MMi3 cricket bat has been designed with T20 games in mind (Photo: Mat Hal...

For many traditional sports fans, cricket is more a religion than a pastime. In India, the game has never been more popular – well, to be more precise, a new form of the game called Twenty20 (20 overs per side, lots of scoring and a lot of entertainment crammed into a few short hours) has appealed to millions of fans. To match the game’s evolution, a new form of cricket bat has appeared - the Mongoose MMi3. The new bat lit up the world scene a couple of nights ago in the hands of one of world cricket’s hardest hitting batsmen - Australia’s Matthew Hayden. He clubbed 93 runs from 43 balls.  Read More

The Cricket ball that measures its own speed

In the game of cricket, the express bowler holds a special place. The fastest of the fast bowlers deliver the ball at around 100mph and since the first radar guns were used to measure ball speed, the public has been fascinated with the ongoing quest to be the “fastest bowler in the world." Now you no longer need a radar gun to get an accurate reading of your speed with a new cricket ball produced that puts the measuring technology inside the ball so any budding Brett Lee can work on their speed.  Read More

Redesigning the cricket helmet

February 28, 2006 Cricket is one of the oldest and most original of all modern sports, originating somewhere between 700 and 900 years ago in England, with international competition beginning a century ago and almost no major rule changes since. As incredible as it may seem to the uninitiated in this most beguiling of contests, each international match lasts 30 hours over five days and often ends without a result, with each international series comprising five such matches (150 hours) also frequently ending without a clear winner. Played with a small, very hard ball which is bowled (thrown with a straight arm), at up to 160 km/h, it is illustrative of the staid mindset afflicting the governing body of the sport that helmets for the human being in the firing line were not introduced until 30 years ago despite a history of horrendous injury. Like nearly everything else in a sport afflicted by stubborn traditionalism, the design of the cricket helmet has trailed well behind the technologies available and with mid-2004 university tests showing that helmets can delay a batsman’s reactions by up to a quarter of a second, you’d think that we might have seen a rethink of cricket helmet design since then, but we haven’t noticed one. Inspired by those tests, designer Ravinder Sembi has reengineered the cricket helmet with a view to overcoming this fundamental problem.  Read More

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