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Cooling

The Chill Puck held to a can with the Chill Band

Beer koozies (aka coasties, coldy-holdys, stubby holders and a multitude of other names) are a summer staple for keeping cans of drink colder, longer. Not satisfied with the cooling capabilities of these foam cylinders, Curt Peters created the Chill Puck, a small hockey puck-shaped disc that fits on the underside of a can.  Read More

Professor Xiong Qihua and his team used a laser to cool the compound Cadmium Sulfide (Phot...

A research team at Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) has successfully used a laser to cool down a semiconductor material known as Cadmium Sulfide. The results of the recently published study could lead to the development of self-cooling computer chips and smaller, more energy efficient air conditioners and refrigerators that don't produce greenhouse gases.  Read More

GE's dual piezo cooling jet consists of a piezoelectric material (the blue bit) attached t...

Despite their shortcomings, fans do a good job of cooling things down inside PC chassis. Unfortunately, their bulky shape and drain on battery life doesn’t make them a viable option for thinner form factors, such as tablets and smartphones, limiting the processing grunt that can be crammed inside such devices. Inspired by lungs and by adapting technology that improves airflow through jet engines, researchers at GE have created a super-thin cooling device they say will enable thinner, quieter and more powerful tablets and laptops.  Read More

A PNIPAM mat, shown on the right, keeps a model house cooler than a mat made from conventi...

We're used to the thought of humans sweating to cool down, but what about buildings? Researchers at ETH Zurich have applied the biological cooling mechanism to the task of keeping a building cool, and in the process have hit upon a novel and inexpensive method of cooling houses which could prove useful for homes in both developed and emerging nations.  Read More

The new roof system includes controls for radiation, convection and insulation, and a pass...

Heating and cooling a house are two of the biggest ongoing costs for homeowners and are responsible for the bulk of the average household’s energy consumption. A new kind of roof-and-attic system field tested at the DoE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) improves the efficiency of both winter heating and summer cooling. Importantly, the new system can be retrofitted to most existing roofs.  Read More

The phase-change drywall absorbs heat during the day, and releases it at night

Scientists from Spain’s Universidad Politécnica de Madrid have created a new type of drywall, that they claim can reduce a building’s energy consumption by up to 40 percent. Its secret? Lots of tiny beads of paraffin.  Read More

Kuchofuku's Air-Conditioned Cooling pants feature two battery powered fans to keep your le...

If you’re looking to complement your air-conditioned shirt with a pair of pants to help keep your bottom half cool in the summer heat then Japanese company Kuchofuku has you covered. The Kuchofuku Air-Conditioned Cooling pants feature two battery-powered fans to direct a refreshing flow of air onto your legs and nether regions.  Read More

A sample of Fraunhofer's CryoSolplus phase-change battery coolant

One of the big enemies of electric vehicle batteries is heat. Batteries already warm up under normal use, but when hot summer temperatures or high workloads are thrown in, overheating becomes a real possibility. According to the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology, running a battery at ten degrees over its maximum “comfort level” of about 35ºC (95ºF) can deplete its service life by half. That’s why researchers there have developed a battery coolant known as CryoSolplus, which is said to offer three times the cooling capacity of plain water.  Read More

The prototype cooling vest and zeolite chamber

Lowering the body’s core temperature has been shown to decrease the likelihood of neurological damage in the event of oxygen deprivation. In a process known as “therapeutic hypothermia,” hospital medical staff will routinely administer chilled water blankets or insert cold drip catheters, in order to protect patients who have just experienced a cardiac arrest or stroke. What can be done, however, when someone has a heart attack far from a hospital? Well, in the near future, bystanders may be able to suit them up with a cooling vest – possibly saving them from permanent brain injury.  Read More

Computer rendition of SuperMUC rendered by SuperMUC (Image: Leibniz-Rechenzentrum der Baye...

An innovative cooling design for SuperMUC, Europe's most powerful supercomputer, will use warm water instead of air to keep tens of thousands of microprocessors at the optimal operating speed and increase peak performance. The system, which is said to cool components 4,000 times more efficiently, will also warm the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre Campus that hosts it during the winter months, generating expected savings of up to US$1.25 million per year.  Read More

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