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Cooking

The cooking simulator being developed at the Tokyo Institute of Technology lets users cook...

I have to admit I find cooking a bit of a chore. As a result, I'm not very good at it and avoid it if at all possible. That’s why at first glance, the idea of a cooking simulator doesn’t really grab me. But with many others in Gen X and Gen Y also lacking the skills to cook up anything but the most basic of meals, my kitchen-novice brethren and I might ultimately benefit from the cooking simulator being developed by researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology.  Read More

The Critter is a portable modular kitchen for indoor/outdoor use

When you’re looking for more “portable” and less "kitchen," you go with something like the My Camp Kitchen camp box – or a trunk-full of camp stoves, grills, charcoal and propane tanks. On the other hand, if you lean more “kitchen” and less “portable,” you might want to look into the Critter, an elaborate portable kitchen designed for serious cookouts.  Read More

The VitalGrill Barbecue (left) and Stove

What do you do when you’re trying to get a reluctant campfire going? You blow on it, of course, to fan the flames. Montreal’s SolHuma Inc. has taken that same idea, and applied it to its VitalGrill camp stove. The portable device burns whatever combustible material can be loaded into it – no special fuels are required – and incorporates a small battery-powered fan that “supercharges” the flames to produce up to 20,000 BTUs of heat.  Read More

The Trekmates Flameless Heating System allows for cooking without the fire

UK-based Trekmates offers a unique way to cook in the outdoors. Its Flamless Cook System eliminates the need to carry a stove or fuel canister and cooks your meals without fire. As such, it doesn't release any dangerous gas and can be used inside a tent.  Read More

A Nomiku immersion circulator held by one of the designers

Sous-vide cooking is one of the crown jewels of molecular gastronomy. Far from "boil-in-a-bag," sous-vide cooking holds ingredients sealed within a plastic pouch at a truly constant (and low) temperature for hours or days. The resulting food is tender, moist, and other-worldly delicious. Unfortunately, this technique has long been priced out of the home kitchen market, with professional units starting around US$1,500 and from there going into the stratosphere. The Nomiku company changes all that, providing a sous-vide accessory about the size of a hand blender. The price? US$359 retail.  Read More

Because the BOT was designed for cooking, it's easy to pull off the heat

Why carry two pieces of gear into the backcountry when you can carry one? That's the question that Vargo answers with the new Titanium BOT. The vessel combines two backcountry essentials - cooking pot and water bottle - into a single, lightweight package.  Read More

The GrillComb promises an easier grilling experience

Some pieces of everyday kit are just begging for an update. The shish kebab skewer is one of those pieces. Despite being the tool for delicious, juicy grilled meat, fish and vegetables, a little tweaking could make the skewer a lot more functional. The GrillComb provides a solid dose of said tweaking.  Read More

The Element works with both gas and electric ranges

For many people, grilling is an activity that's limited to the warmer months, when clear weather makes preparing dinner outside both practical and enjoyable. Once the weather turns, the rain cover comes out and grilling is over. The Element Indoor Smokeless BBQ brings grilling inside, where people can enjoy it year round.  Read More

The SousVide Supreme Demi precisely controls food cooking temperatures

Boil-in-a-bag takes on a whole new meaning thanks to Eades Appliance Technology's (EAT) SousVide Supreme Demi. Using a cooking technique that was once the reserve of laboratories and upmarket restaurants, the SousVide Supreme Demi aims to provide home chefs with the means to create perfectly cooked dishes with laboratory precision in a compact, affordable, countertop “water oven” that’s as easy to operate as a slow cooker and only consumes as much power as a 60-watt incandescent bulb.  Read More

The AGA iTotal Control Cooker can be remotely controlled by text message, dedicated websit...

AGA’s new electric iTotal Control Cooker incorporates three separate independently-operating ovens, assigned to the roasting, baking and simmering of foods. It also has a snazzy touchscreen panel, which can be used to control those ovens. Additionally, there’s a boiling plate and a simmering plate on top. What really makes it special, however, is the fact that it can be controlled from anywhere in the world.  Read More

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