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Condom

— Computers

"USB condom" keeps your devices safe in public ports

By - September 16, 2013 2 Pictures
Conscious that injudiciously inserting one's USB charger into just any old public port might expose one's handheld device to any manner of nasty malware (or data theft, for that matter), experimental security outfit int3.cc has come up with the USBCondom, a go-between device that creates a break between the data pins of your USB connector and those of the public USB port you're plugging into. The power connection is maintained, however, allowing you to charge your smartphone or what-have-you in a state of graceful equanimity. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Nanostructured fabric could protect women against pregnancy and HIV

By - December 6, 2012 1 Picture
While condoms are the only things that protect against both unwanted pregnancies and HIV, a lot of people aren’t big fans of stopping to put them on. Additionally, women are sometimes put in an awkward role, needing to pressure the man to use the thing – although female condoms certainly do exist, their bulkiness makes them rather unpopular. Now, however, a team of scientists from the University of Washington are working on a type of dissolvable fabric that could be used by women both for contraception and HIV protection. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

One-Handed Condom is a snap to open

By - September 10, 2012 3 Pictures
Safe sex and contraception are awkward subjects for many people, especially when it comes time to actually use them. In a moment that's all about maintaining the mood, nothing can spoil the romance like struggling to pry open a condom wrapper like a bag of airline peanuts. With that in mind, imagine what a minefield a night of intimacy could be for someone suffering from hemiplegia, a somewhat common disorder that causes paralysis on one side of the body. That's why one designer developed the One-Handed Condom, an easy-open contraceptive that can be flicked open just by snapping it between two fingers. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Condoms with QR codes track sites of safe sex

By - February 29, 2012 1 Picture
Over the past few years, it seems almost impossible to even take a trip to the grocery store without bumping into dozens of QR codes - those square graphics that can be scanned with a smartphone camera to bring up all sorts of information. Now it appears a Seattle-based organization has found another place to put them: in your pants. In hopes of promoting safe sex, Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest distributed 55,000 condoms with QR codes that track when and where people make the beast with two backs through their website, WhereDidYouWearIt.com. Read More
— Science

Forensic tech would link sex offenders to condoms

By - January 20, 2011 1 Picture
Sexual offenders are increasingly using condoms when committing their assaults, both to reduce the risk of sexually-transmitted diseases, and to avoid leaving their DNA at the crime scene. While an offender might still leave their fingerprints behind, that often only proves that they were at a given location, and not that they were involved in any wrongdoing. Researchers from the Biomedical Research Centre at Sheffield Hallam University, however, have recently developed technology that detects condom lubricant in fingerprints. If a suspect could be tied to a crime scene by their fingerprints, and be shown to have handled a condom at that location – well, they’d have a lot more explaining to do. Read More
— Medical

Sensis QuickStrips - a quicker, cleaner and much less awkward way to get a condom on

By - April 7, 2010 2 Pictures
Since the ancient Romans first strapped treated goat's bladders to their peckers, the venerable condom has been protecting people from pregnancy, itchy giblets and worse for hundreds of years. And while modern condoms are fairly reliable and allow much more sensitivity than the old multi-use sheep's intestine jobbies ever did, they're still far from foolproof. So we're always impressed when somebody steps up and tries to improve on a time-honoured design - in this case, Sensis has announced a new technology that gets condoms on faster, safer and cleaner - making them more effective, and crucially cutting down on the mood-killing awkwardness we're all familiar with. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

AIDS-preventing gel to protect women in resource-poor areas

By - August 16, 2009 1 Picture
The statistics paint a grim picture - an estimated 2.0 million people, including 270,000 children, died of AIDS in 2007 and at that time 33 million people around the globe were living with HIV, two thirds of them in sub-Saharan Africa. New advancements in microbicides may help to improve this horrific scenario with U.S. researchers undertaking trials for a specially designed ‘molecular condom’ to prevent the spread of HIV in women. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Condometric - the condom that measures the size of your penis

By - November 25, 2008 6 Pictures
November 26, 2008 Madrid-based Curiosite has come up with a product that will surely be one of the novelty hits of 2009. The Condometric is a condom with a measuring ruler printed on the side that will accurately determine the size of the wearer’s penis. Currently in manufacturing, the condom will be available in four flavours (lime, cherry, banana and prophylactic rubber), both metric and imperial measurements (centimetres and inches), and in packs of 3, 6 and 12 (the party pack?). Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

World's largest condom on display

By - February 17, 2007 8 Pictures
February 18, 2007 In recognition of National Condom Week, a Washington retailer of sex products will sail a monster condom balloon the height of a two-story building, tethered on a 120-foot line over its Tukwila store. The condom will fly through the weekend to remind citizens of the importance of condoms and safe sex. The sturdy 20-foot pink condom has a diameter of 6-feet and is filled with 450 cubic feet of helium, a volume that requires the contents of four large welder’s tanks to fill. In a classic case of getting the events out of sequence, National Condom Week is celebrated the week AFTER Valentine’s Day each year. It was started in 1978 by students at the University of California-Berkeley and over three decades has become an important global event in the promotion of condom use as an effective method of decreasing the risk of AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases, not to mention reducing the risk of pregnancy. Read More
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