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Concrete

The home was completed in 2014 (Photo: Vito Stallone)

With prime building space dwindling in many areas, canny developers realize that apparently undesirable plots can be perfectly profitable with the right architect. L3P Architekten recently produced a good argument for building on such sites, with the House Vineyard Dieseldorf: an unusual glass-fronted concrete home located in a cramped plot in Dielsdorf, Switzerland.  Read More

The Gulf Stream Tank aquarium will form the centerpiece of the new Patricia and Phillip Fr...

An impressive engineering operation has been carried out to create the centerpiece of the new Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science in Miami. Created in one continuous concrete pour that took 24 hours and 49 minutes, the 500,000 gal Gulf Stream Tank aquarium will be home to a number of deep sea species which visitors will be able to view from both top and bottom.  Read More

In the future, could architects click-and-print their projects? (Photo: Skanksa)

Following our recent report of a Chinese company printing 10 houses in a day, the potential for architects to essentially click-and-print complex large-scale projects on a regular basis has moved a step closer to reality. This week, the UK's Loughborough University announced a deal with construction company Skanska and architecture firm Foster + Partners to develop and commercialize 3D concrete printing.  Read More

The Konzerthaus Blaibach when empty (Photo: Edward Beierle)

Buildings that contain auditoriums generally need to be large in order to fit tiered seating inside. A recently completed concert hall in Blaibach, Germany, however, creates this tiered effect in a simpler way. The whole building slopes down towards the front of the performance space.  Read More

The Wall of Nishihara, by Sabaoarch (Photo: Yuji Nishijima)

As our cities grow increasingly crowded and house prices rise, plots that would have once been considered unsuitable for building upon are becoming more attractive and profitable. With this in mind, Tokyo's 3 m (9.8 ft) wide Wall of Nishihara is located on a plot shoehorned between two roads.  Read More

A study carried out at MIT suggests that altering the quantities of materials in cement mi...

As one of our most relied upon construction materials, concrete makes a significant contribution to our overall carbon emissions. Calcium-based substances are heated at high temperatures to form the cement, a process that produces carbon dioxide. But by slightly altering the quantities of materials used, scientists from MIT have uncovered a new method of cement mixing that could reduce these emissions by more than half.  Read More

Andrey Rudenko's 3D-printed castle

Though 3D printing technology is still relatively new, it may become an important tool for architects and the construction industry, as highlighted by projects like the recent 3D-printing of 10 homes in a day. The latest example of this progress comes via US-based Andrey Rudenko, who has created a small concrete "castle" structure in his backyard using a large 3D printer he built himself. Next up, he's making a house.  Read More

The Seaside Periscope, by Adam Wierciński (Image: Adam Wierciński Architekt)

It's no easy task for an architect to put his or her stamp on basic facilities like public restrooms. Architect Adam Wierciński has managed it though, and his Seaside Periscope concept comprises a public toilet that sports a working periscope system.  Read More

A concrete beam coated with the skin (above), and a computer map of the cracks in it

Although concrete structures such as bridges are now often built with strain sensors embedded within them, that certainly hasn't always been the case. In order to alert authorities to cracks developing within these older structures, one solution involves attaching sensors to them. Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Eastern Finland are working on an alternative, however – an electrically-conductive paint-on "sensing skin."  Read More

House for Trees, by Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Photo: Hiroyuki Oki)

Like many inner-city residential areas, the Tan Binh district in Vietnam's Ho Chi Min City is rather lacking in greenery. Local firm Vo Trong Nghia Architects sought to make daily life more comfortable for one family by constructing something of a private oasis within the bustling metropolis.  Read More

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