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Computers

Invisible computer mouse cost only $20 to build

Pranav Mistry, Pattie Maes and Liyan Chang from MIT's Media Lab have managed to create an invisible computer mouse for just a few dollars. Using an Infrared laser and tracking camera, the Mouseless system registers and interprets a user's hand movement and translates it into onscreen actions such as cursor movement and button clicking.Read More

Music

Microbook pocket-sized PC or Mac recording studio

The MicroBook from MOTU aims to bring professional level studio recording capabilities to a Mac or PC computer. The bus-powered USB interface offers users up to four simultaneous inputs as well as a host of studio mixing tools and audio analyzers. It uses industry standard Mac and PC drivers to ensure maximum software compatibility and is small and light enough to fit in a pocket.Read More

Computers

Anobit unites the best of two worlds for faster, cheaper SSDs

Solid state drives (SSD) have been around for some time. Unlike other data storage devices, however, their cost per GB seems reluctant to drop quickly enough to make sense economically not just to consumers, but to enterprises as well. Using a recently patented technology, the Israeli startup Anobit has announced an SSD series that makes a huge step toward making SSDs a tangibly faster and more affordable solution for the enterprise world.Read More

Computers

Sony introduces VAIO J Series all-in-one desktop PCs

One of the first all-in-one desktop computers I ever laid eyes on was a widescreen beauty from Sony. Nearly seven years later, the company's latest entry into an increasingly crowded market brings multi-touch, high definition multimedia entertainment in a powerful and attractive package. The VAIO J Series sports the latest Intel Core processors and GeForce graphics, backed up by generous system memory and a good sized hard drive. It also brings an adaptive and intuitive media application to the party, along with an easy launch program bar across the top of the desktop screen.Read More

Computers

ASUS Eee Keyboard now has Commodore rival

What goes around, comes around - so goes the saying. Many moons ago a certain computer-in-a-keyboard affectionately coined the C64 took over the world and gave a whole generation a taste of things to come. Now Commodore USA has given the keyboard computer a modern facelift, resulting in an all-in-one solution powered by an Intel Atom processor and sporting a 5 inch touchscreen display.Read More

Computers

ExoPC Slate - the new Windows multi-touch tablet

ExoPC has developed a Windows-based tablet PC which is larger and more powerful than an iPad, is WiFi-enabled and supports Flash. The Slate will be available with 32GB and 64GB SSD storage, benefit from 2GB of memory and has a built-in webcam... but will this be enough to make it a serious contender in the emerging tablet computer market?Read More

Electronics

LEO II – the world’s first commercially available computer

The latest in our series of early technologies from Michael Bennett-Levy’s collection looks at the world’s first commercial business computer, the LEO II/3. The LEO II (short for Lyons Electronic Office) was the successor to the LEO I, which was designed by Oliver Standingford and Raymond Thompson of J. Lyons and Co. – one of the UK’s leading catering and food manufacturing companies in the first half of the 20th century. Read More

Science

Scientists create organic 'molecular computer'

Researchers from Japan and the Michigan Technological University have succeeded in building a molecular computer that, more than any previous project of its kind, can replicate the inner mechanisms of the human brain, repairing itself and mimicking the massive parallelism that allows our brains to process information like no silicon-based computer can.Read More

Environment

Internet could lower its cooling bills by using hot water

It’s easy to think of the Internet as something that’s just “out there” in cyberspace, that doesn’t effect the physical world in any tangible way. In 2009, however, it was estimated that Internet data centers worldwide consumed about 2% of global electricity production. Not only did most of that electricity undoubtedly come from non-green sources, but it also cost the global economy approximately 30 billion US dollars. Much of the electricity was needed to power the data centers’ forced air cooling systems, that keep the servers from overheating. Now, researchers from IBM Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH) have devised a much more efficient method for cooling the steamy Internet - they use hot water.Read More

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