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A computer bit circa 1958 from the LEO II/3 computer

The latest in our series of early technologies from Michael Bennett-Levy’s collection looks at the world’s first commercial business computer, the LEO II/3. The LEO II (short for Lyons Electronic Office) was the successor to the LEO I, which was designed by Oliver Standingford and Raymond Thompson of J. Lyons and Co. – one of the UK’s leading catering and food manufacturing companies in the first half of the 20th century.  Read More

Researchers have succeeded in building a molecular computer that can mimic the inner worki...

Researchers from Japan and the Michigan Technological University have succeeded in building a molecular computer that, more than any previous project of its kind, can replicate the inner mechanisms of the human brain, repairing itself and mimicking the massive parallelism that allows our brains to process information like no silicon-based computer can.  Read More

Two of the microchannel hot water heat sinks, on a server blade from IBM/ETH's Aquasar sup...

It’s easy to think of the Internet as something that’s just “out there” in cyberspace, that doesn’t effect the physical world in any tangible way. In 2009, however, it was estimated that Internet data centers worldwide consumed about 2% of global electricity production. Not only did most of that electricity undoubtedly come from non-green sources, but it also cost the global economy approximately 30 billion US dollars. Much of the electricity was needed to power the data centers’ forced air cooling systems, that keep the servers from overheating. Now, researchers from IBM Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETH) have devised a much more efficient method for cooling the steamy Internet - they use hot water.  Read More

The 3rd Space FPS Gaming Vest uses pneumatic air pockets to simulate physical blows when g...

Seeing as we recently told you about the stunningly-goofy HaptiHug, which allows you to receive the physical sensation of a hug via your computer, here’s a similar but much more macho product – the 3rd Space FPS Gaming Vest. With its game-activated internal pneumatic pockets, the FPS has no interest in hugging you, but it will gladly simulate a gunshot to your torso.  Read More

The Polar CS500 cycling computer features a large screen and rocker switch operation

If you’re a racing cyclist, barreling down the side of the highway at 30mph, what do you not want to be doing? Stabbing at your bike computer's little buttons, or squinting at its little displays, that’s what! Or at least, that’s what the folks over at Polar think. That’s why they’ve designed their latest cycling computer, the CS500, with a couple of unique features – an oversized LCD display, and for the first time on a cycling computer, a rocker switch.  Read More

The Ergoroller computer wrist support massages your wrist as you use it

Over the years, we’ve profiled a lot of ergonomic computer mice here on Gizmag. They’ve all taken the approach of redesigning the mouse itself to alleviate computer-related repetitive strain injuries (RSI’s). The Ergoroller, however, looks to a redesign of the wrist support to achieve the same ends. Like a conventional wrist support, it provides a place to rest your mousing arm, so you’re not constantly straining to hold it in position. Unlike one, however, it contains two rows of steel bearings, that massage your tendons and ligaments as you move your hand.  Read More

The Ultraprojector stand-alone video projector - no frills but does what it was designed t...

Over the years, we’ve profiled some pretty fancy video projectors here on Gizmag, but this one ... well, it ain’t one of them. But that's the point. The Ultraprojector has no sound, no menu or controls, and a screen resolution of just 320x240 pixels. On the plus side, though, it doesn’t need to be hooked up to a video source when projecting, it runs silently, it’s weather-resistant (not waterproof) and it’s cheap...ish.  Read More

The design of the Touchy Remix is perfect for those that prefer to sit

Microsoft’s Surface and Ideum’s offering might have blazed a lightly traveled trail for touch-sensitive computerized tables, but they seem to have overlooked one important factor - they are difficult to comfortably use while sitting down due to their boxy shape. German artist Janis Pönisch has solved this problem with her design for the outer shell of the Touchy Remix – a multi-touch table that people can actually sit at.  Read More

Panasonic's H1 Field tablet computer is light enough for use by couriers

Panasonic has announced a new field-ready addition to its Toughbook range, the Toughbook H1 Field tablet computer. Built with highly mobile professionals in mind, the new weatherproof and shockproof model benefits from a dual battery setup that should help ensure power is always available, a sunlight-visible touchscreen interface, reinforced solid state storage and a molded hand grip for extra comfort.  Read More

Andrew Weekley demonstrates on-screen IODA;s capabilities of detecting bad data. Photo: Ca...

We rely so heavily on information gathered by satellites and weather instruments to help us program our daily lives, imagine what would happen if the data we received from these technologies went bad and foretold of cataclysmic outcomes in the days or weeks ahead? Panic could induce scenes on our streets reminiscent of Hollywood disaster movies. To avert such events - or just help get things right even if the forecast is more mundane - scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU) have devised an innovative computational technique called Intelligent Outlier Detection Algorithm, or IODA, that draws on statistics, imaging, and other disciplines in order to detect errors in sensitive technological systems.  Read More

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