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The Ergoroller computer wrist support massages your wrist as you use it

Over the years, we’ve profiled a lot of ergonomic computer mice here on Gizmag. They’ve all taken the approach of redesigning the mouse itself to alleviate computer-related repetitive strain injuries (RSI’s). The Ergoroller, however, looks to a redesign of the wrist support to achieve the same ends. Like a conventional wrist support, it provides a place to rest your mousing arm, so you’re not constantly straining to hold it in position. Unlike one, however, it contains two rows of steel bearings, that massage your tendons and ligaments as you move your hand.  Read More

The Ultraprojector stand-alone video projector - no frills but does what it was designed t...

Over the years, we’ve profiled some pretty fancy video projectors here on Gizmag, but this one ... well, it ain’t one of them. But that's the point. The Ultraprojector has no sound, no menu or controls, and a screen resolution of just 320x240 pixels. On the plus side, though, it doesn’t need to be hooked up to a video source when projecting, it runs silently, it’s weather-resistant (not waterproof) and it’s cheap...ish.  Read More

The design of the Touchy Remix is perfect for those that prefer to sit

Microsoft’s Surface and Ideum’s offering might have blazed a lightly traveled trail for touch-sensitive computerized tables, but they seem to have overlooked one important factor - they are difficult to comfortably use while sitting down due to their boxy shape. German artist Janis Pönisch has solved this problem with her design for the outer shell of the Touchy Remix – a multi-touch table that people can actually sit at.  Read More

Panasonic's H1 Field tablet computer is light enough for use by couriers

Panasonic has announced a new field-ready addition to its Toughbook range, the Toughbook H1 Field tablet computer. Built with highly mobile professionals in mind, the new weatherproof and shockproof model benefits from a dual battery setup that should help ensure power is always available, a sunlight-visible touchscreen interface, reinforced solid state storage and a molded hand grip for extra comfort.  Read More

Andrew Weekley demonstrates on-screen IODA;s capabilities of detecting bad data. Photo: Ca...

We rely so heavily on information gathered by satellites and weather instruments to help us program our daily lives, imagine what would happen if the data we received from these technologies went bad and foretold of cataclysmic outcomes in the days or weeks ahead? Panic could induce scenes on our streets reminiscent of Hollywood disaster movies. To avert such events - or just help get things right even if the forecast is more mundane - scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU) have devised an innovative computational technique called Intelligent Outlier Detection Algorithm, or IODA, that draws on statistics, imaging, and other disciplines in order to detect errors in sensitive technological systems.  Read More

Using the interactive game tiles

Board games aren’t necessarily bound to become obsolete - at least, not if researchers at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada have anything to say about it. They will change, however. Queen’s Human Media Lab (HML) recently unveiled a prototype board game that uses traditional flat cardboard tiles (i.e: cards), but the images on those tiles are projected onto them by an overlooking digital projector. The images stay on the tiles as they’re moved around by the players, courtesy of an overlooking camera that tracks their movements. This means that the tiles could display moving video, that their display could change entirely depending on what’s happening in the game, or that it could be customized by the players. Monopoly night may never be the same.  Read More

The AirMouse wearable mouse

It’s no secret... Studies have shown that excessive mouse usage can cause repetitive stress injuries. Unfortunately for most of us, “excessive” can mean anything more than a few hours a day. Fortunately, however, there are alternative styles of mice out there designed to be easier on the hands and arms. One of the more interesting ones to come along in a while is the AirMouse, made by Canadian firm Deanmark Ltd. What makes it unique is the fact that you wear it like a glove.  Read More

The HP Wall of Touch is made up of as many as nine 43 to 46-inch, 1080p panels

About a year ago, HP began working on a ginormous touchscreen display for their PR firm’s Manhattan offices. The resulting product, called the Wall of Touch, was such a hit that it has found its way into the workplaces of other select clients, with more on the way. Ironically, despite its name, one of the things that makes the Wall unique is that users don’t have to actually touch it.  Read More

The Bowers and Wilkins MM-1 computer speaker strikes a sexy pose

Bowers and Wilkins has taken its five decade's experience with loudspeakers and created a true hi-fi computer speaker, which it unveiled this week at CES. The MM-1 is a serious speaker made small, with two separate drive units including an aluminum dome tweeter, and Digital Signal Processing that uses USB streaming to bypass the computer's own soundcard.  Read More

ClickFree's new range takes the hassle out of backing up files

Most Gizmag readers should be aware of the importance of backing up data, and this is probably because at one time or another countless hours of work have been lost due to hard drive failure or any other of a number of disaster scenarios. Taking the hassle out of backing up would therefore seem a good idea, and Clickfree is back at this year’s CES with some follow-ups to its 2009 Transformer.  Read More

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