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CompactFlash

Although the LCD screens on most cameras are sufficient for reviewing your shots, wouldn’t it be even better to be able to check them out on the larger screen of an iPad? You can already do so, but it involves running a USB cable from the camera to the computer (via an adapter), then transferring the photos across. It would be a lot quicker and simpler if you could just slip the camera’s memory card into the tablet, but unfortunately iPads don’t have built-in card readers. You can, however, buy the next-best thing: a plug-in CF or SD card reader, designed specifically for the iPad. Read More
Much of the world these days relies heavily on memory – not the human kind, but the manufactured variety. Many of us have a plethora of memory cards and sticks kicking around in devices like cameras, smart phones, USB thumb drives, etc., but have you ever wondered what goes into the manufacture of a memory chip. This "behind the scenes" promotional video from major manufacturer Lexar provides an interesting insight to the process – it takes the company one month and more than 800 processes to make a memory chip and the clean room in which they are produced is 100 times cleaner than a hospital operating room. That means in order to get in you have to do a lot more than just wash your hands. Read More
Hot on the heels of the latest CompactFlash specification being released, SanDisk, Nikon and Sony have joined forces to propose a new specification to better cope with the high definition demands of today and tomorrow. The new proposal will give users more than three times the data transfer speeds of the current specification, and take storage capacity into the domain of the multi-terabyte. Read More
The body responsible for setting the standards for CompactFlash cards, the CompactFlash Association, has announced the specs for the latest 5.0 revision of the mass storage format. CompactFlash 5.0 adds 48-bit addressing (up from 28-bit) which enables an increased data transfer unit size of 32MB per transfer (up from 128KB) and a maximum capacity of 144PB (up from 137GB)... that's 144,000 terabytes! Read More
The Nexto eXtreme ND2700 is a 320GB 2.5" SATA drive in an enclosure with two memory card slots, enabling the backup of CompactFlash, SD/SDHC, MMC/MMCPlus, MS/MS Pro-HG/MS Pro MagicGate, and xD cards (and more, with an optional adapter) without a computer. It can also backup straight from your camera using the USB OTG port, and features USB 2.0 and eSATA connectors, the latter of which means you can pull data off the drive at an average of 60 megabytes per second. Read More
Any professional photographer who has bought a cheap flash memory card and spent hours offloading gigabytes of images, or had their memory card stall when trying to shoot in burst mode, would know that not all memory cards are created equal. SanDisk’s new line of Extreme Pro CompactFlash memory cards proves this point by offering 90MB/s peak read and write speeds – double the performance of previous SanDisk high-end camera memory cards. Read More
SanDisk has used the Photokina trade fair to announce a 12.5-percent jump in speed (now 45 megabytes per second) and the addition of a 16-gigabyte version to its Extreme IV high-performance memory card line. Read More
SanDisk has added a 32GB CompactFlash (CF) card to its Extreme III line which offers transfer rates of 30 MB/s and enough capacity to store more than 80 minutes of 100 MB/s, 10-bit, 4:2:2 HD video. The card will be priced at around USD$300 when it hits stores worldwide in October. Read More
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