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Communications


— Electronics

New RF circulator to run rings around old technology

By - November 12, 2014 2 Pictures
In the world of electronic components, there are many devices out there that do their job well and reliably, but are almost never heard of – even though they may be vital to equipment that plays a role in our technology-driven lives. The radio frequency (RF) circulator is just such a device: it has simply done its job as a nondescript box of gubbins buried in radio communications systems, quietly directing radio frequency signals to the places they should go. Now researchers at the University of Texas have given the RF circulator a makeover. Not only is the new prototype smaller, lighter, and cheaper, it's also claimed to be easily adapted to different frequencies on the fly, which is something the old style circulator cannot do. Read More
— Space

MAVEN uses special radio to relay data from Curiosity Mars rover

By - November 10, 2014 3 Pictures
NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft is the latest link in the space agency's Martian communications network for keeping in touch with its surface rovers. Last week, the unmanned orbiter carried out a test using a special radio apparatus that allowed it to relay 550 megabits of data from the Curiosity rover to NASA’s Deep Space Network back on Earth. Read More
— Telecommunications

Breaking the speed record: Multi-core optical fibers achieve 255 Tbps

By - November 3, 2014
Researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology and the University of Central Florida have developed a new fiber optics cable capable of transmitting the contents of over 5,000 DVDs in a single second – a speed six times greater than the previous record. The advance could help us reach petabit-per-second speeds over the next few years, which will be crucial for keeping up with growing bandwidth demands. Read More
— Electronics

DARPA circuit smashes electronic speed record

By - October 30, 2014 3 Pictures
Getting into the Guinness Book of World Records isn't just about who can eat the most hotdogs or fly a paper airplane the highest. Sometimes it involves technological breakthroughs with huge potential. Guinness has handed DARPA’s Terahertz Electronics program the award for the fastest solid-state amplifier integrated circuit. Developed by Northrop Grumman, the Terahertz Monolithic Integrated Circuit (TMIC) is a ten-stage common-source amplifier that cranks speeds of one terahertz (1012 Hz), or one trillion cycles per second. Read More
— Science

Science Museum exhibit explores the Information Age

By - October 25, 2014 8 Pictures
If the 19th and 20th centuries were the Transportation Age, then the 21st century is the Information Age. Like most other ages, it didn't suddenly leap into being with the arrival of the Web or the smartphone – it has a history going back more than 200 years. The Science Museum in London is exploring this history in a new permanent exhibit called "Information Age: Six Networks That Changed Our World," which was recently opened by Queen Elizabeth II when she sent the first tweet by a British monarch. Read More
— Mobile Technology

Apps to easily encrypt your text messaging and mobile calls

By - September 27, 2014 9 Pictures
Mobile phone users are becoming more savvy to the potential security risks of standard, unencrypted text messaging and wary of government intrusion into everyday communications. Some consumers require encrypted phone calls for information-sensitive business requirements and others just don't like the idea of others prying into their personal lives. Gizmag takes a look at a sampling of the apps available for iOS and Android (and sometimes desktop) to encrypt mobile communications, both text messaging and phone calls. Read More
— Outdoors

ICEdot adds user-activated Trigger to its emergency communications line

By - September 26, 2014
Two years ago, ICEdot presented the Crash Sensor, an emergency notification device designed to mount to sports helmets. After getting it to market last year, the company found that although its customers liked having the sensor-activated emergency notification, some of them also wanted to have a manual emergency notification. ICEdot has responded with the Emergency Trigger. Read More
— Science

Researchers achieve long-distance light to matter quantum teleportation

By - September 22, 2014
A successful test in passing information from light into matter – using the teleportation of the quantum state of a photon via optical fiber cable to a receiving crystal located over 25 km (15 mi) away – has been claimed by physicists at the University of Geneva. This test shattered the same team’s previous record and may herald the development of greater, long-distance teleportation techniques and qubit communications and computing capabilities. Read More
— Electronics

Ant-sized radios could help connect trillions of devices to the Internet of Things

By - September 15, 2014
A team of researchers from Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley, has created prototype radio-on-a-chip communications devices that are powered by ambient radio waves. Comprising receiving and transmitting antennas and a central processor, the completely self-contained ant-sized devices are very cheap to manufacture, don't require batteries to run and could give the "Internet of Things" (IoT) a serious kick start. Read More
— Automotive

Honda showcases latest intelligent transportation tech at ITS World Congress

By - September 11, 2014 2 Pictures
Honda took the occasion of the 2014 ITS World Congress in Detroit to show off some of the company’s latest accomplishments in the field of intelligent transportation. The technologies on display are part of Honda’s goal of a "collision-free society" and "safety for everyone" through assisted driving systems that protect not only the car’s occupants, but pedestrians, cyclists, and others on the road. Read More
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