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Comfort


— Bicycles

Infinity Seat may look minimal, but it's said to be comfy

By - October 21, 2013 5 Pictures
Of all the complaints that cyclists have about cycling, butt pain/numbness has got to be the biggest. While it's become very common to see bike saddles with a cut-out section in the middle, that's more for relieving pressure specifically on the crotch area (you know what I'm talking about). California chiropractor and triathlete Vincent Marcel, however, has extended that cut-out to include almost the entire inside of the saddle. The result, his Infinity Seat, is said to be very easy on the bum indeed. Read More
— Health and Wellbeing

Newly announced FreedMan Chair claimed to replicate standing spine posture

By - October 4, 2013 17 Pictures
"It became readily apparent that many of the problems my patients were experiencing had been created by the lack of a suitable chair," says Simon Freedman, an osteopath of 20 years. "But as hard as I looked, I just couldn't find a chair to recommend to them. I decided to see if I could make one myself." After a claimed 15 years of development, Simon has announced his FreedMan Chair, which he says is the only chair that allows the spine and pelvis posture that we experience standing up. Read More
— Sports

BioFloat bicycle seatpost lets the seat move with the rider

By - November 26, 2012
For a great many people, one of the most unpleasant aspects of cycling is feeling every little bump in the road, transmitted through the seat and into their butt. Various companies have responded by offering suspension seatposts, such as the BodyFloat and the CF3 Pro Carbon. While those and others soak up some vibrations by flexing up and down, the prototype BioFloat seatpost takes things further – it functions as a shock absorber, but it also allows the seat to move around sort of like the head on a bobblehead doll, moving with the rider’s pelvis instead of pressing into it. Read More
— Good Thinking

XTable: A height-adjustable workstation for those who like both sitting and standing

By - October 25, 2012 5 Pictures
It's a positive thing that we're all different; that humanity isn't made up of automatons who all have the same wants, needs, and desires. Unfortunately while each of us can furnish our homes in whichever way we see fit, the same isn't true of our places of work. Those who work in offices generally have to make do with whatever furniture is provided, even if it doesn't suit their individual needs. Providing options is therefore a good strategy, and XTable from Holmris offers nothing but options. Read More

Nissan developing "fatigue-free" car seats

You might think that it requires no effort to sit in a car seat. According to the engineers at Nissan, however, that’s not the case. That said, they’ve designed a new type of seat that they claim requires less physical effort to use, thus lessening driver fatigue and discomfort. Read More
— Around The Home

The Viera folds to create custom furniture

By - October 19, 2012 8 Pictures
Go to almost any public park or college campus, and you're likely to find a large number of people ignoring any benches in favor of lounging around on the grass. Many people enjoy relaxing in an open environment, which is almost impossible to find in a typical apartment or office building. That's why one design team recently set out to recreate that feeling of openness indoors with the Viera concept, a mat of connected cushions that can fold to form multiple places to sit. Read More
— Urban Transport

Ergon's CF3 seatpost will put a spring (or two) in your ride

By - October 5, 2012 5 Pictures
Nobody likes getting a sore butt (or numb “other areas”) while cycling, yet a lot of cyclists also don’t want the added weight of a suspension seatpost – even a snazzy one like the BodyFloat. Well, those individuals may well be interested in Ergon Bike Ergonomics’ forthcoming CF3 Pro Carbon seatpost. Made from two parallel carbon fiber leaf springs, it actually weighs less than some conventional carbon seatposts. Read More
— Urban Transport

BodyFloat puts shocks under the seat for improved riding comfort

By - October 4, 2012 16 Pictures
Looking for a way to make his frequent bike journeys a little less arduous while assisting rural village development in Kenya and Uganda, veteran frame builder Paul Barkley found that existing spring seats just didn't offer the kind of action, adjustability, performance and comfort he was looking for, so he set about designing one that did. When he discovered that the first prototype worked much better than expected, he set about refining the design. After spending more than a year riding, testing, racing and tweaking, he teamed up with keen cyclist Charlie Heggem to form Cirrus Cycles and bring the BodyFloat to market. The seatpost suspension system is claimed to smooth out the terrain below by levitating the rider above the bike, resulting in a comfortable ride and allowing for a smooth, comfortable and efficient pedal stroke without bounce, flex or wasted energy. Read More
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